Etymology
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animalism (n.)
1828, "brutishness, state of being a (mere) animal; moved by sensual appetites as opposed to intellectual or moral forces," from animal + -ism. From 1857 as "the doctrine that man is a mere animal."
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carabineer (n.)
also carbineer, "mounted soldier armed with a carbine," 1670s, from French carabinier (17c.), from carabine "carbine" (see carbine). Italian carabinieri "soldiers serving as a police force" is the same word.
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Arnout (n.)
"native of Albania," especially as part of the Turkish military forces, 1717, from Turkish Arnaut, from Modern Greek Arnabites, metathesized from Arbanites, rhotacized from *Albanites, from Medieval Latin Albanus (see Albania).
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biomechanics (n.)
also bio-mechanics, "study of the action of forces on the body," 1931, from bio- + mechanic (also see -ics). Earlier (1924) it was a term in Russian theater, from Russian biomekhanika (1921).
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galleon (n.)

kind of large ship, 1520s, from French galion "armed ship of burden," and directly from Spanish galeón "galleon, armed merchant ship," augmentative of galea, from Byzantine Greek galea "galley" (see galley) + augmentative suffix -on. Developed 15c.-16c., it was shorter, broader, and with a higher stern superstructure than the galley. In English use, especially of Spanish royal treasure-ships or the government warships that escorted private merchant ships in the South American trade.

GALLEON. The accepted term for the type of ship which the Spaniards used in 1588; that is, an armed merchantman of exceptional quality, combining the strength of the mediaeval trader with some of the finer lines and fighting features of the GALLEY. [Sir Geoffrey Callender, "Sea Passages," 1943]

Italian agumented form of galea, galeaza, led to a different 16c. ship-name in English, galliass (1540s).

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raglan (n.)

type of coarse overcoat popular from c. 1855, by 1856, named for British general Lord Raglan (1788-1855), commander of British forces in the Crimean War. The name is from a place in Wales.

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imperium (n.)
"authority to command the national military forces," in extended use "an empire," 1650s, from Latin imperium "command, supreme authority, power" (see empire). Hence Latin phrase imperium in imperio "a state within a state."
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bowman (n.)
"fighting man armed with a bow," late 13c.; as a surname early 13c., from bow (n.1) + man (n.). Bowman's capsule (1882) was named for English surgeon William Bowman (1816-1892).
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chassepot (n.)

bolt-action breechloading rifle introduced into the French army 1866-68 and used by French forces in the Franco-Prussian War, 1870, named for French inventor Antonine-Alphonse Chassepot (1833-1905).

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paramilitary (adj.)

"in reference to organizations or forces analogous or auxiliary to that of military units but not professional," 1935, from para- (1) + military. In early use often in reference to the S.A. and S.S. of Nazi Germany.

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