Etymology
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sweetbread (n.)

"pancreas of an animal used as food" 1560s, from sweet (adj.); the -bread element may be from Old English bræd "flesh."

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territorial (adj.)

1620s, "of or pertaining to a territory," from Late Latin territorialis, from territorium (see territory). In reference to British regiments, from 1881. In reference to an area defended by an animal, from 1920. Territorial waters is from 1841. Territorial army "British home defense" is from 1908. Territorial imperative "animal need to claim and defend territory" is from 1966.

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carnivore (n.)

"flesh-eating animal," 1839, from French carnivore (16c.), from Latin carnivorus "flesh-eating" (see carnivorous).

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fatling (n.)

"lamb, kid, or other young animal fattened for slaughter," 1520s, from fat (n.) + -ling.

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cave-dweller (n.)

"prehistoric human or animal who lived in natural caves," 1857, from cave (n.) + dweller.

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brinded (adj.)

also brended, of animal hide, "variegated by streaks and spots," early 15c., the older form of brindled (q.v.).

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wild (n.)

"uncultivated or desolate region," 1590s, in the wilds. From wild (adj.). Earlier it meant "wild animal" (c. 1200).

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road kill (n.)

also roadkill, "animal killed by vehicular traffic," 1962, from road (n.) + kill (n.). The figurative sense is from 1992.

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membral (adj.)

"of or pertaining to the limbs of an animal," as distinguished from its body proper, c. 1600; see member + -al (1).

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fennec (n.)

fox-like animal of Africa, 1790, from Arabic fenek, fanak "a name vaguely applied to various fur-bearing animals" [OED].

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