Etymology
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cross-section (n.)

"section of something made by a plane passing through it at a right angle to one of its axes," 1748, originally in engineering sketches, from cross (adj.) + section (n.). Figurative sense of "representative sample" is by 1903.

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quoin (n.)

1530s, in architecture and masonry, "cornerstone, external solid angle," a variant spelling of coin (n.); in early use also in other senses of that word, including "a wedge, wedge-like piece of stone, wood, etc."

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two-time (v.)
"to deceive, cheat, betray," 1924, perhaps from notion of "to have two at a time." An earlier reference (1922) in a Kentucky criminal case involves a double-cross or betrayal without a romance angle. Related: two-timing (adj.); two-timer.
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arete (n.1)
"sharp crest of a mountain," 1862, from Swiss French arête, Old French areste, from Latin arista "ear of grain, the top of an ear," in Medieval Latin also "backbone of a fish; exterior angle of a house," which perhaps is of Etruscan origin. The figure is of something jagged.
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geniculate (adj.)
"having knots or joints; bent like a knee," 1660s, from Latin geniculatus "having knots, knotted," from geniculum "little knee, knot on the stalk of a plant," diminutive of genu "knee" (from PIE root *genu- (1) "knee; angle"). Related: Geniculation (1610s).
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benchmark (n.)
also bench-mark, "surveyor's point of reference," 1838, from a specialized surveyors' use of bench (n.) + mark (n.1); figurative sense is from 1884. The literal use is in reference to an angle-iron stuck in the ground as a support ("bench") for the leveling-staff.
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miter (n.2)

in carpentry, "a joint at a 45 degree angle," 1670s, of uncertain origin, perhaps from mitre, via notion of joining of the two peaks of the folded cap. As a verb, to make or join with a miter-joint," from 1731. Related: Mitered. Miter-box is attested from 1670s.

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rectangular (adj.)

"right-angled, having an angle or angles of 90 degrees," 1620s, from French rectangulaire (16c.) or formed in English from Latin stem of rectangle + -ar. Of the competitor adjectives fallen lifeless about this word rectangulous (1610s) is perhaps most to be mourned. Related: Rectangularity.

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nookie (n.)

also nooky, "sexual activity," slang, generally used by men, by 1928, perhaps from Dutch neuken "to copulate with," but it is not impossible to connect it to nook (n.) on the notion of "an angle" or "a secluded spot." The adjective nooky "full of nooks, nook-like" is recorded from 1813.

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pentagon (n.)

1560s, "plane figure with five angles and five sides," from French pentagone (13c.) or directly from Late Latin pentagonum "pentagon," from Greek pentagōnon, a noun use of the neuter of the adjective pentagōnos "five-angled," from pente "five" (from PIE root *penkwe- "five") + gōnia "angle, corner" (from PIE root *genu- (1) "knee; angle"). The U.S. military headquarters known as the Pentagon was completed in 1942, and so called for its shape; used allusively for "U.S. military leadership" from 1945; Pentagonese "U.S. official military jargon" is by 1951. Related: Pentagonal.

In nature, pentagonal symmetry is rare in inanimate forms. Packed soap bubbles seem to strive for it but never quite succeed, and there are no mineral crystals with true pentagonal structures. But pentagonal geometry is basic to many living things, from roses and forget-me-nots to sea urchins and starfish. [Robert Bringhurst, "The Elements of Typographic Style," 1992]
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