Etymology
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shelta (n.)
secret language of Irish tinkers, 1876, of unknown origin. According to OED it mostly consists of Irish or Gaelic words with inversion or arbitrary substitution of initial consonants.
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Avis 

U.S. car rental company, according to company history founded 1946 at Willow Run Airport in Detroit by U.S. businessman Warren Avis and named for him.

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emmet (n.)
"ant," from Old English æmete (see ant), surviving as a dialect word in parts of England; also, according to OED, in Cornwall a colloquial name for holiday tourists.
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Tammuz (n.)
Babylonian and Assyrian god (identified with Adon), according to Klein's sources probably from Babylonian Du'uzu, contraction of Dumu-zi "the son who rises," also interpeted as "the faithful son."
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impolitic (adj.)
"not according to good policy," c. 1600, from assimilated form of in- (1) "not, opposite of" + politic (adj.) "judicious." Related: Impoliticly. Impolicy "quality of being impolitic" is attested from 1747.
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izard (n.)
chamois-like antelope of the Pyrenees, 1791, from French isard, Gascon isart, "perhaps of Iberian origin" (according to French sources), or [Klein] from Basque (which has izzara "star").
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classify (v.)

"arrange in a class or classes, arrange according to common characteristics," 1782, from French classifier, from classe (see class (n.)) + -fier (see -fy). Related: Classified; classifying.

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pleat (n.)

"a fold," 1580s, variant of plait (n.). With a gap in the printed record 17c.-18c., but according to OED probably it was in continuous oral use. Compare the verb.

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effectuate (v.)
"bring to pass, accomplish, achieve," 1570s, from French effectuer, from Latin effectus "an effecting, accomplishment, performance" (see effect (n.)). According to OED, formed "on the model of" actuate. Related: Effectuated; effectuating.
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shipshape (adj.)
also ship-shape, "properly arranged," 1640s, originally "according to the fashion of a (sailing) ship," where neatness is a priority and the rigging must be serviceable and stowed properly; from ship (n.) + shape (n.).
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