Etymology
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date (n.3)

"liaison at a particular time, by prearrangement," 1885, gradually evolving from date (n.1) in its general sense of "appointment." The romantic sense is by 1890s. Meaning "person one has a date with" is by 1900. Date-rape is attested by 1973.

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manipulate (v.)

1827, "to handle skillfully by hand," a back-formation from manipulation. As "to manage by mental influence," especially for one's own purposes, is by 1864. Financial sense is from 1870. By 1949 it served as a euphemism for "masturbate." Related: Manipulated; manipulating.

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print-out (n.)

1899, "image reproduced by other means than chemical photographic development," from the verbal phrase print out (by 1884); see print (v.) + out (adv.). Meaning "sheet of printed matter produced by a computer or other automatic apparatus" is by 1953.

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ho-hum 
expression of boredom, by 1906. As an adjective, by 1956.
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multiracial (adj.)

also multi-racial, "of, pertaining to, or characterized by several races," especially "characterized by coexistence of different races," by 1903, from multi- "many" + racial.

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decongestant (n.)

"a decongestive agent," by 1950; see de- + congest + -ant. Related: Decongestion (1901); decongest (v.), by 1912; decongestive (adj.), by 1922.

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juice (v.)
1630s, "to suffuse with juice," from juice (n.). Meaning "to enliven" attested by 1964. Related: Juiced; juicing. Juiced (adj.) "drunk" is attested by 1946; later "enhanced or as if enhanced by steroids" (by 2003).
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crossed (adj.)

 "made in the shape of a cross, marked by a line drawn across," past-participle adjective from cross (v.). Figurative sense of "thwarted" is from 1620s. To be crossed out "cancelled by crossing lines" is by 1780. Crossed wires as figurative of confusion, miscommunication is by 1910. 

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muscle (v.)

1913, "to accomplish by strength," from muscle (n.). Meaning "coerce by violence or pressure" is by 1929 in U.S. underworld slang. Related: Muscled; muscling.

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payoff (n.)

also pay-off, by 1905, "winnings from gambling," from pay (v.) + off (adv.). Meaning "graft, bribes" is attested by 1930. The verbal phrase pay off is by 1710 in the sense of "pay in full and discharge" (workers); by 1937 as "be profitable, succeed."

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