Etymology
Advertisement
carnation (n.)

common name of the Dianthus Caryophyllus or "pink," a herbaceous perennial flowering plant native to southern Europe but widely cultivated from ancient times for its fragrance and beauty and abundant in Normandy, 1530s, of uncertain origin. The early forms are confused; perhaps (on evidence of early spellings) it is a corruption of coronation, from the flower's being used in chaplets or from the toothed crown-like look of the petals.

Or it might be called for its pinkness and derive from French carnation "person's color or complexion" (15c.), which probably is from Italian dialectal carnagione "flesh color," from Late Latin carnationem (nominative carnatio) "fleshiness," from Latin caro "flesh" (originally "a piece of flesh," from PIE root *sker- (1) "to cut"). OED points out that not all the flowers are this color.

This carnation had been borrowed separately into English as "color of human flesh" (1530s) and as an adjective meaning "flesh-colored" (1560s; the earliest use of the word in English was to mean "the incarnation of Christ," mid-14c.). It also was a term in painting for "representation of the flesh, nude or undraped parts of a figure" (1704).

Related entries & more 
Advertisement
carnelian (n.)
"red variety of chalcedony," variant of cornelian, altered by influence of Latin carnem "flesh" because of its color.
Related entries & more 
carneous (adj.)
1570s, "fleshy;" 1670s, "flesh-colored," from Latin carneus "of flesh," from carn-, stem of caro- "flesh" (see carnivorous).
Related entries & more 
carnival (n.)
1540s, "time of merrymaking before Lent," from French carnaval, from Italian carnevale "Shrove Tuesday," from older Italian forms such as Milanese *carnelevale, Old Pisan carnelevare "to remove meat," literally "raising flesh," from Latin caro "flesh" (originally "a piece of flesh," from PIE root *sker- (1) "to cut") + levare "lighten, raise, remove" (from PIE root *legwh- "not heavy, having little weight").

Folk etymology is from Medieval Latin carne vale " 'flesh, farewell!' " From 1590s in figurative sense "feasting or revelry in general." Meaning "a circus or amusement fair" is attested by 1926 in American English.
Related entries & more 
Carnivora (n.)
order of meat-eating mammals, 1830, from Latin (animalia) carnivora "flesh-eating (animals)," neuter plural of carnivorus "flesh-eating" (see carnivorous). Applied as the scientific name of a large order of flesh-eating mammals by French naturalist Georges Léopole Chrétien Frédéric Dagobert, Baron Cuvier (1769-1832). Related: Carnivoral.
Related entries & more 
Advertisement
carnivore (n.)
"flesh-eating animal," 1839, from French carnivore (16c.), from Latin carnivorus "flesh-eating" (see carnivorous).
Related entries & more 
carnivorous (adj.)
"eating or feeding on flesh," 1640s, from Latin carnivorus "flesh-eating, feeding on flesh," from caro (genitive carnis) "flesh" (originally "a piece of flesh," from PIE root *sker- (1) "to cut") + vorare "to devour" (from PIE root *gwora- "food, devouring"). Related: Carnivorously; carnivorousness; carnivoracity.
Related entries & more 
carny (n.)
1931, U.S. slang, short for carnival worker (see carnival).
Related entries & more 
carob (n.)
common English name of a leguminous evergreen tree native to the eastern Mediterranean lands, 1540s, from French carobe, ultimately from Arabic (Semitic) kharrub "locust bean pod" (also in Persian as khirnub), perhaps from Assyrian kharubu or Aramaic kharubha "carob tree, carob." Related to Hebrew harubh.
Related entries & more 
Carol 
masc. proper name, from Medieval Latin Carolus, which is of Germanic origin, from the common noun meaning "man, husband" (see carl). As a fem. proper name, an abbreviation of Caroline. The masc. name never has been popular in U.S.; the fem. form was common after c. 1900 and was a top-10 name for U.S. girls born 1936-1950.
Related entries & more 

Page 59