Etymology
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anguishous (adj.)
(obsolete), "full of wrath," also "anxious," early 13c., from Old French angoissos "anxious, worried, distressed; difficult; painful," from angoisse "distress, anxiety, rage" (see anguish (n.)). Related: Anguishously.
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angrily (adv.)
mid-14c., "resentfully, in anger; ill-temperedly," from angry + -ly (2).
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anglicization (n.)
"process of making English in form or character," 1836, noun of action from anglicize; earlier in same sense was anglification (1822), from anglify (1751).
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antenuptial (adj.)
"prior to marriage," 1757, originally in reference to children's births, from Late Latin antenuptialis; see ante- + nuptial.
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ant-hill (n.)
also anthill, "mound of dirt formed by ants in building their nest," late 13c., from ant + hill (n.).
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anti-imperialist (adj.)
1898, American English, in debates about the Spanish-American War, from anti- + imperialist. It was the title of a weekly anti-war publication begun in 1899. Related: Anti-imperialism.
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anaphylaxis (n.)
"severe allergic reaction," 1905, from Latin anaphylaxis, perhaps based on French anaphylaxie (1902); see anaphylactic.
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Anglophobia (n.)
"intense hatred or fear of England or what is English," 1793 (Jefferson), from Anglo- + -phobia. Related: Anglophobe; Anglophobic (adj.); Anglophobiac (n.).
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anthropogeny (n.)

"origination of the human race," 1833, from anthropo- + -geny. Related: Anthropogenesis "origination or evolution of man" (1862; from 1855 in German and French); anthropogony "doctrine of man's origin" (1847).

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anthropometry (n.)
"science of the measurement and dimensions of the parts of the human body," 1839, from anthropo- + -metry "a measuring of." Perhaps modeled on French anthropometrie (by 1806).
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