Etymology
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antiquation (n.)

1640s, "action of making or becoming antiquated;" 1650s, "state of being antiquated," from Late Latin antiquationem (nominative antiquatio), noun of action from past-participle stem of antiquare "restore to its ancient condition," in Late Latin "make old," from antiquus "ancient, of olden times; aged, venerable; old-fashioned" (see antique (adj.)).

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anti-scorbutic (n.)
also antiscorbutic, "preparation that counteracts scurvy," 1690s, from anti- "against" + medical Latin scorbutus "scurvy" (see scorbutic). From 1725 as an adjective.
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Antwerp 
port city in Belgium, French Anvers, from a Germanic compound of *anda "at" + *werpum "wharf" (see wharf). Folk etymology connects the first word with hand.
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Anabaptism (n.)
name of a Christian doctrine (see Anabaptist), 1570s, from Late Latin anabaptismus, literally "a second baptism," from Ecclesiastical Greek anabaptismos, from ana "again, anew" (see ana-) + baptismos "baptism" (see baptism).
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anachronistic (adj.)
"erroneous in date, involving anachronism," 1775; see anachronism + -istic.
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ananda (n.)
in Hindu theology, "bliss," from Sanskrit ananda- "joy, happiness, bliss," from stem of nandati "he rejoices," which is of unknown origin.
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anear (adv.)
"nearly," c. 1600, from a- (1) + near (adv.). Meaning "close by" (opposite of afar) is from 1798. As a preposition, "near to," 1732.
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anext (adv.)
"next to," c. 1400, from a- (1) + next.
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anesthesiology (n.)

1908, from anesthesia + -ology.

Anesthesiology. This is the new term adopted by the University of Illinois defining "the science that treats of the means and methods of producing in man or animal various degrees of insensibility with or without hypnosis." [Medical Herald, January, 1912]
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Anglomania (n.)
"excessive or undue enthusiasm for England and all things English," 1787 (Jefferson); see Anglo- + mania. Related: Anglomaniac.
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