Etymology
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syndic (n.)

c. 1600, "a civil magistrate, especially in Geneva," from French syndic "chief representative" (14c.), from Late Latin syndicus "representative of a group or town," from Greek syndikos "public advocate," as an adjective, "belonging jointly to," from syn- "together" (see syn-) + dike "judgment, justice, usage, custom" (see Eurydice). Meaning "accredited representative of a university or other corporation" first found c. 1600. Related: Syndical.

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syndicalism (n.)

1907, from French syndicalisme "movement to transfer ownership of means of production and distribution to industrial workers," from syndical "of a labor union," from syndic "chief representative" (see syndic).

"Syndicalism" is in France the new, all-absorbing form of Labor's conflict with Capital. Its growth has been so rapid that its gravity is not appreciated abroad. This year, even more than last, the strikes and other "direct action," which it has combined, have upset the industrial life of the country, and forced the attention of Parliament and Government. [The Nation, June 20, 1907]
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syndicate (v.)

1889, "form into a syndicate," from syndicate (n.). Meaning "sell for simultaneous publication" is from 1889. Earlier it meant "to judge, censure" (1610s), from Medieval Latin syndicatus, past participle of syndicare. Related: Syndicated; syndicating.

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syndicate (n.)

1620s, "council or body of representatives," from French syndicat (15c.), from syndic "representative of a corporation" (see syndic) + -at (see -ate (1)). Meaning "combination of capitalists or companies to carry out some commercial undertaking" first occurs 1865. Publishing sense of "association of publishers for purchasing articles, etc., for simultaneous publication in a number of newspapers" is from 1889. As a synonym for "organized crime, the Mob" it is recorded from 1929.

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syndication (n.)

1887, "act of forming a syndicate," from syndicate (n.) + -ion. Sense of "publication, broadcast, or ownership by a syndicate" is attested from 1925.

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syndrome (n.)

"a number of symptoms occurring together," 1540s, from medical Latin, from Greek syndrome "concurrence of symptoms, concourse of people," from syndromos "place where several roads meet," literally "a running together," from syn- "with" (see syn-) + dromos "a running, course" (see dromedary). Psychological sense is from 1955.

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syne (adv.)

in Burns' poem "Auld Lang Syne" (1788), the usual Scottish form of obsolete sine (adv., conj.) "after that, afterward; before now, ago," c. 1300, an adverb from Middle English sin, a contraction of sithen "afterward, from now on," for which see since. Syne is the same word as since, but without the adverbial genitive inflection.

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synecdoche (n.)

"figure of speech in which a part is taken for the whole or vice versa," late 15c. correction of synodoches (late 14c.), from Medieval Latin synodoche, alteration of Late Latin synecdoche, from Greek synekdokhe "the putting of a whole for a part; an understanding one with another," literally "a receiving together or jointly," from synekdekhesthai "supply a thought or word; take with something else, join in receiving," from syn- "with" (see syn-) + ek "out" (see ex-) + dekhesthai "to receive," related to dokein "seem good" (from PIE root *dek- "to take, accept"). Typically an attribute or adjunct substituted for the thing meant ("head" for "cattle," "hands" for "workmen," "wheels" for "automobile," etc.). Compare metonymy. Related: Synecdochical.

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synechia (n.)

plural synechiae, "morbid union of parts, especially of the eye," 1842, medical Latin, from Greek synekheia "continuity," from synekhes "continuous," from syn "together" (see syn-) + ekhein "to hold" (from PIE root *segh- "to hold").

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synergetic (adj.)

"working together, cooperating," 1680s, from Greek synergetikos "cooperative," from synergein "to work together, cooperate" (see synergy). Synergic (1849) is from synergy + -ic.

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