Etymology
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Los Angeles 
city in southern California, U.S., founded 1781; the modern name is short for the original, given variously as El Pueblo de Nuestra Señora de los Ángeles or El Pueblo de la Reyna de los Ángeles.
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Marie Antoinette 

(1755-1793), queen consort of Louis XVI; as the name for a decorative style of France in that period, by 1887. She likely did not say "let them eat cake" (see cake (n.)). The city of Marietta, Ohio, U.S., founded in 1788, was named for her in honor of Louis XVI's financial support of the American Revolution.

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-ant 

agent or instrumental suffix, from Old French and French -ant, from Latin -antem, accusative of -ans, present-participle suffix of many Latin verbs. Compare -ance.

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anymore (adv.)
one-word form by 1865, from any + more. Typically used with a negative, a custom as old as Middle English, where without any more is found late 14c.
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anthropological (adj.)
1786, from anthropology + -ical. Related: Anthropologically.
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anti-Semitic (adj.)
"of or pertaining to anti-Semites," 1881, see anti-Semitism.
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antidotal (adj.)
1640s, from antidote + -al (1). Related: Antidotally.
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antifebrile (n.)
also anti-febrile, 1660s, "having the property of abating fever," from anti- + febrile. As a noun, "substance which abates fever," 1859.
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