Etymology
Advertisement
synod (n.)

late 14c., "ecclesiastical council," from Late Latin synodus, from Greek synodos "assembly, meeting; a coming together, conjunction of planets," from syn- "together" (see syn-) + hodos "a traveling, journeying; a manner or system (of doing, speaking, etc.); a way, road, path," a word of uncertain origin (see Exodus). Earlier in English as sinoth (early 12c.). Used by Presbyterians for "assembly of ministers and other elders" from 1593 to c. 1920, when replaced by General Council.

Related entries & more 
Advertisement
synodal (adj.)

mid-15c., from Late Latin synodalis, from synodus (see synod).

Related entries & more 
synodic (adj.)

1630s, from Late Latin synodicus, from Greek synodikos, from synodos (see synod). Related: Synodical (1560s).

Related entries & more 
synonym (n.)

"word having the same sense as another," early 15c. (but usually in plural form before 18c., or, if singular, as synonyma), from Old French synonyme (12c.) and directly from Late Latin synonymum, from Greek synonymon "word having the same sense as another," noun use of neuter of synonymos "having the same name as, synonymous," from syn- "together, same" (see syn-) + onyma, Aeolic dialectal form of onoma "name" (from PIE root *no-men- "name").

Related entries & more 
Advertisement
synonymous (adj.)

c. 1600, of words, "denoting the same idea," from Medieval Latin synonymus, from Greek synonymos, from synonymon (see synonym). Related: Synonymously.

Related entries & more 
synonymy (n.)

1650s, "use of synonyms;" 1794, "quality of being synonymous," from French synonymie and directly from Late Latin synonymia, from Greek synonymos (see synonymous).

Related entries & more 
synopsis (n.)

1610s, "a general view, an outline," from Late Latin synopsis "a synopsis," from Greek synopsis "a general view," literally "a seeing altogether, a seeing all at once," from syn- "together" (see syn-) + opsis "sight, appearance," from PIE root *okw- "to see."

Related entries & more 
synoptic (adj.)

1763, "pertaining to synopsis," from Modern Latin synopticus, from Late Latin synopsis (see synopsis). Greek synoptikos meant "taking a general or comprehensive view," and the sense "affording a general view" in English emerged by mid-19c. Specifically of the first three Gospels from 1841, on notion of "giving an account of events from the same point of view." Related Synoptical (1660s).

Related entries & more 
synovial (adj.)

1756, "pertaining to the synovia," albuminous fluid secreted by certain glands, from Modern Latin sinovia (16c.), probably coined by Paracelsus and apparently an invented word. With -al (1).

Related entries & more 

Page 568