Etymology
Advertisement
systematic (adj.)
1670s, "pertaining to a system," from French systématique or directly from Late Latin systematicus, from Greek systematikos "combined in a whole," from systema (genitive systematos); see system. From 1789 as "methodical," often in a bad sense, "ruthlessly methodical." Related: Systematical (1660s); systematically.
Related entries & more 
Advertisement
systematise (v.)
chiefly British English spelling of systematize; for suffix, see -ize. Related: Systematised; systematising; systematisation.
Related entries & more 
systematize (v.)
"make into a system," 1764, from French systématiser or a native formation from system (Greek stem systemat-) + -ize. Related: Systematized; systematizing.
Related entries & more 
systemic (adj.)
1803, irregularly formed from system + -ic; used in medicine and biology for differentiation of meaning from systematic. Related: Systemically.
Related entries & more 
Advertisement
systole (n.)

"periodic contraction of the heart and arteries," 1570s, from Greek systole "a drawing together, contraction," from syn- "together" (see syn-) + stem related to stellein "to bring together, draw in; to put, set, place," from PIE *stel-yo-, suffixed form of root *stel- "to put, stand, put in order," with derivatives referring to a standing object or place.

Related entries & more 
systolic (adj.)
1690s, from Modern Latin systolicus, from Greek systole "a drawing together, contraction" (see systole).
Related entries & more 
*syu- 
syū-, also sū:-, Proto-Indo-European root meaning "to bind, sew."

It forms all or part of: accouter; couture; hymen; Kama Sutra; seam; sew; souter; souvlaki; sutra; sutile; suture.

It is the hypothetical source of/evidence for its existence is provided by: Sanskrit sivyati "sews," sutram "thread, string;" Greek hymen "thin skin, membrane," hymnos "song;" Latin suere "to sew, sew together;" Old Church Slavonic šijo "to sew," šivu "seam;" Lettish siuviu, siuti "to sew," siuvikis "tailor;" Russian švec "tailor;" Old English siwian "to stitch, sew, mend, patch, knit together."
Related entries & more 
syzygy (n.)
"conjunction or opposition of a heavenly body with the sun," 1650s, from Late Latin syzygia, from Greek syzygia "yoke of animals, pair, union of two, conjunction," from syzygein "to yoke together," from assimilated form of syn- "together" (see syn-) + zygon "yoke" (from PIE root *yeug- "to join"). Related: Syzygial; Syzygiacal; Syzygetic.
Related entries & more 
Szechwan 
also Szechuan, place name, said to mean "four rivers," from Chinese si "four" + chuan "river."
Related entries & more 

Page 561