Etymology
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anti-freeze (n.)
also antifreeze, 1935, shortening of anti-freeze solution (1913); see anti- + freeze (v.).
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anticyclone (n.)

"outward rotary flow of air from an area of atmospheric high pressure," 1863, coined by Francis Galton, English polymath, explorer, and meteorologist, from anti- + cyclone. Related: Anticyclonic.

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Anti-American (adj.)

also antiamerican, 1773, in reference to British parliamentary policies, from anti- + American. As a noun by 1788. Related: Anti-Americanism "opposition to what is distinctly American" (1844).

The term "anti-American" is a loose one, and loosely employed. My own working definition of it, admittedly a slack one also, is that a person is anti-American if he or she is consistently contemptuous of American culture and furthermore supports any opponent of U.S. policy, whoever this may be. [Christopher Hitchens, review of "The Life of Graham Greene, Vol. II," The Atlantic, March 2005]
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antistrophe (n.)
part of an ancient Greek choral ode, 1610s, from Latin, from Greek antistrophe "the returning of the chorus," "answering to a previous [strophe], except that they now moved from left to right instead of from right to left" [Liddell & Scott], literally "a turning about, a turning back," from antistrephein, from anti "opposite, in opposition to; in return" (see anti-) + strephein "to turn" (from PIE root *streb(h)- "to wind, turn"). Related: Antistrophic.
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anyplace (n.)
1911 as one word; two-word form is in Middle English (late 14c.); from any + place (n.).
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anybody (n.)
c. 1300, ani-bodi, "any person," from any + body. One-word form attested by 1826. Phrase anybody's game (or race, etc.) is from 1840.
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anyone (n.)
"any person or persons," 1844 as one word; since Old English as two words, from any + one. Old English also used ænigmon in this sense, Middle English eani mon, ani on; also compare anybody.
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ancient (n.)
"standard-bearer," 1590s, short for ancient-bearer (1570s), from ancient "flag, banner, standard" (1550s), a corruption of ensign (q.v.). Archaic, but preserved in Shakespeare's character Aunchient Pistoll in "Henry V."
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