Etymology
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adjust (v.)
Origin and meaning of adjust

late 14c., ajusten, "to correct, remedy," from Old French ajuster, ajoster "add; assemble; calibrate, gauge, regulate," from Late Latin adiuxtare "to bring near," from ad "to" (see ad-) + Latin iuxta "next, close by" (from suffixed form of PIE root *yeug- "to join").

In 16c. French corrected to adjuster, but the pedantic effort was rejected and Modern French has ajouter. Influenced in form and sense by folk-etymology, as if from ad- + iustus "just, equitable, fair."

English reborrowed the word by c. 1600 in sense "arrange, settle, compose," from French adjuster "fit (things together) properly, put things in order." The meaning "arrange (something) so as to conform with (a standard or another thing)" is from 1660s. The insurance sense is from 1755 (see adjuster). To adjust to "get used to" is attested by 1924. Related: Adjusted; adjusting.

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adjustable (adj.)

"capable of being adjusted," 1775, from adjust + -able. Related: Adjustably; adjustability.

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adjuster (n.)

1670s, agent noun in English form from adjust. The insurance sense of "one who settles the amount to be paid for a claim under a policy, after making proper allowances and deductions," is from 1830.

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adjustment (n.)

"a making fit or conformable; the act of adapting to a given purpose; orderly regulation or arrangement," 1640s, from French ajustement (Old French ajostement) or else a native formation from adjust (v.) + -ment.

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adjustor (n.)

1857, of certain muscles that "adjust," or make fit together; agent noun in Latin form from adjust (v.).

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adjutant (n.)

"military officer who assists superior officers," c. 1600, from Latin adiutantem (nominative adiutans), present participle of adiutare "to give help to, help zealously, serve," frequentative of adiuvare (past participle adiutus) "help, assist, aid, support," from ad "to" (see ad-) + iuvare "to help, give strength, support," which is perhaps from the same root as iuvenis "young man" (see young (adj.)).

French adjudant, earlier ajudant (early 18c.) is from Spanish cognate ayudante. Related: Adjutancy. The adjutant bird is the name given by the English in Bengal to a large type of Indian stork, so called for its "stiff martinet air" [Century Dictionary].

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administer (v.)
Origin and meaning of administer

late 14c., aministren, later administren, "to manage as a steward, control or regulate on behalf of others," from Old French aministrer "help, aid, be of service to" (12c., Modern French administrer), and directly from Latin administrare "to help, assist; manage, control, guide, superintend; rule, direct," from ad "to" (see ad-) + ministrare "to serve, attend, wait upon," from minister "inferior, servant, priest's assistant" (see minister (n.)).

The -d- was restored 14c.-16c. in French and after 15c. in English. In reference to punishment, justice, etc., "to dispense, bring into operation" (especially as an officer), from mid-15c. In reference to medicines, medical treatment, etc., "to give," from 1540s. Related: Administered; administering.

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administrate (v.)

"manage or direct affairs," 1630s, from Latin administratus, past participle of administrare "manage, control, superintend" (see administer) or else a back-formation from administrator, administration. Related: Administrated; administrating.

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administration (n.)

mid-14c., administracioun, "act of giving or dispensing;" late 14c., "management (of a business, property, etc.), act of administering," from Latin administrationem (nominative administratio) "aid, help, cooperation; direction, management," noun of action from past-participle stem of administrare "to help, assist; manage, control, guide, superintend; rule, direct," from ad "to" (see ad-) + ministrare "to serve, attend, wait upon," from minister "inferior, servant, priest's assistant" (see minister (n.)).

It is attested by early 15c. as "management of a deceased person's estate under a commission from authority." The sense of "management of public affairs" is from 1680s; hence, "executive power in a government" (1731), though in Britain later government was used in this sense. The meaning "a U.S. president's period in office" is recorded by 1796 in the writings of George Washington.

The administration of government, in its largest sense, comprehends all the operations of the body politic, whether legislative, executive, or judiciary; but in its most usual, and perhaps in its most precise, signification, it is limited to executive details, and falls peculiarly within the province of the executive department. ["The Federalist," No. 72 (Hamilton)]
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administrative (adj.)

"pertaining to administration, having to do with the managing of public affairs," 1731, from Latin administrativus, from administrat-, past-participle stem of administrare "to manage, control, superintend" (see administer). Related: Administratively.

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