Etymology
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synonymous (adj.)
c. 1600, of words, "denoting the same idea," from Medieval Latin synonymus, from Greek synonymos, from synonymon (see synonym). Related: Synonymously.
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synonymy (n.)
1650s, "use of synonyms;" 1794, "quality of being synonymous," from French synonymie and directly from Late Latin synonymia, from Greek synonymos (see synonymous).
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synopsis (n.)
1610s, "a general view, an outline," from Late Latin synopsis "a synopsis," from Greek synopsis "a general view," literally "a seeing altogether, a seeing all at once," from syn- "together" (see syn-) + opsis "sight, appearance," from PIE root *okw- "to see."
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synoptic (adj.)
1763, "pertaining to synopsis," from Modern Latin synopticus, from Late Latin synopsis (see synopsis). Greek synoptikos meant "taking a general or comprehensive view," and the sense "affording a general view" in English emerged by mid-19c. Specifically of the first three Gospels from 1841, on notion of "giving an account of events from the same point of view." Related Synoptical (1660s).
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synovial (adj.)
1756, "pertaining to the synovia," albuminous fluid secreted by certain glands, from Modern Latin sinovia (16c.), probably coined by Paracelsus and apparently an invented word. With -al (1).
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syntactic (adj.)
1771, from Modern Latin syntacticus, from Greek syntaktikos "a joining together, a joining in order," from syntassein "put in order" (see syntax).
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syntactical (adj.)
1570s; from Latin stem of syntax + -ical. Related: Syntactically.
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syntagmatic (adj.)
1937, from French syntagmatique (de Saussure), from Greek syntagma "that which is put together in order," from syntassein (see syntax).
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syntax (n.)
c. 1600, from French syntaxe (16c.) and directly from Late Latin syntaxis, from Greek syntaxis "a putting together or in order, arrangement, a grammatical construction," from stem of syntassein "put in order," from syn- "together" (see syn-) + tassein "arrange" (see tactics).
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synthesis (n.)
1610s, "deductive reasoning," from Latin synthesis "collection, set, suit of clothes, composition (of a medication)," from Greek synthesis "composition, a putting together," from syntithenai "put together, combine," from syn- "together" (see syn-) + tithenai "to put, to place," from reduplicated form of PIE root *dhe- "to set, put." From 1733 as "a combination of parts into a whole." Earlier borrowed in Middle English as sintecis (mid-15c.). Plural syntheses.
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