Etymology
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synechia (n.)
plural synechiae, "morbid union of parts, especially of the eye," 1842, medical Latin, from Greek synekheia "continuity," from synekhes "continuous," from syn "together" (see syn-) + ekhein "to hold" (from PIE root *segh- "to hold").
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synergetic (adj.)
"working together, cooperating," 1680s, from Greek synergetikos "cooperative," from synergein "to work together, cooperate" (see synergy). Synergic (1849) is from synergy + -ic.
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synergism (n.)
1650s, "theological doctrine that human will cooperates with divine grace in regeneration" (implying that the fall did not cost the soul all inclination toward holiness), from Modern Latin synergismus, from Greek synergos "working together" (see synergy). Used in non-theological sense "a working together, cooperation" by 1910 (first of medicines).
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synergist (n.)
1650s, in theology, one who holds the doctrine of synergism (q.v.); from 1876 in medicine. For ending, see -ist.
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synergistic (adj.)
1818 in theology; 1876 in medicine, from synergist + -ic. General sense of "cooperative" is from 1965. Related: Synergistical (1650s); synergistically.
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synergize (v.)
1881; see synergy + -ize. Related: Synergized; synergizing.
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synergy (n.)
1650s, "cooperation," from Modern Latin synergia, from Greek synergia "joint work, a working together, cooperation; assistance, help," from synergos "working together," related to synergein "work together, help another in work," from syn- "together" (see syn-) + ergon "work" (from PIE root *werg- "to do"). Meaning "combined activities of a group" is from 1847; sense of "advanced effectiveness as a result of cooperation" is from 1957.
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synod (n.)

late 14c., "ecclesiastical council," from Late Latin synodus, from Greek synodos "assembly, meeting; a coming together, conjunction of planets," from syn- "together" (see syn-) + hodos "a traveling, journeying; a manner or system (of doing, speaking, etc.); a way, road, path," a word of uncertain origin (see Exodus). Earlier in English as sinoth (early 12c.). Used by Presbyterians for "assembly of ministers and other elders" from 1593 to c. 1920, when replaced by General Council.

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synodal (adj.)
mid-15c., from Late Latin synodalis, from synodus (see synod).
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synodic (adj.)
1630s, from Late Latin synodicus, from Greek synodikos, from synodos (see synod). Related: Synodical (1560s).
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