Etymology
Advertisement
adios (interj.)

1837, American English, from Spanish adios, from phrase a dios vos acomiendo "I commend you to God;" the French form is adieu (q.v.).

Related entries & more 
Advertisement
adipose (adj.)

"pertaining to fat, fatty," 1743, from Modern Latin adiposus "fatty," from Latin adipem (nominative adeps, genitive adipis) "soft fat of animals, fat, lard," which is said to be from Greek aleipha "unguent, fat, anything used for smearing," a word related to lipos "grease, fat," from PIE root *leip- "to stick, adhere," also used to form words for "fat." With change of -l- to -d- "prob. due to Umbrian influence" [Klein]. But it could as well be a native Italic formation from the same roots.

Related entries & more 
Adirondack (adj.)

1906 in reference to a type of lawn or deck chair said to have been designed in 1903 by a Thomas Lee, owner of the Westport Mountain Spring, a resort in the Adirondack region of New York State. Commercial manufacture is said to have begin the following year but it was at first called Westport chair after the town where it was made.

Adirondack Mountains is a back-formation from Adirondacks, which was treated as a plural noun but really it is from Mohawk (Iroquoian) adiro:daks "tree-eaters," a name they applied to neighboring Algonquian tribes. The -s is an imperfective affix.

Related entries & more 
adit (n.)

"entrance," especially "horizontal mine excavation," c. 1600, from Latin aditus "an approach, an entrance; a going to or drawing near," from past participle stem of adire "to approach," from ad "to" (see ad-) + ire (past participle itus) "to go" (from PIE root *ei- "to go").

Related entries & more 
adjacence (n.)

"state of lying close or contiguous," c. 1600, from Medieval Latin adjacentia, abstract noun from Latin adiacens "lying at," present participle of adiacere "lie at, border upon, lie near," from ad "to" (see ad-) + iacēre "to lie, rest," related to iacere "to throw; lay ('cast (oneself) down')," from PIE root *ye- "to throw, impel."  Related: Adjacency, which occasionally was used in the sense of "that which is adjacent."

Related entries & more 
Advertisement
adjacent (adj.)

early 15c., "contiguous, bordering; close, nearby," from Latin adiacentem (nominative adiacens) "lying at," present participle of adiacere "lie at, border upon, lie near," from ad "to" (see ad-) + iacēre "to lie, rest," related to iacere "to throw; to lay" (from PIE root *ye- "to throw, impel"). Only of things, never of persons or animals. Adjacent, properly, is near but not necessarily in contact; adjoining is so as to touch. Latin adiacentia meant "the neighborhood."

Related entries & more 
adjectival (adj.)

"of or like an adjective," 1797, from adjective + -al (1). Related: Adjectivally (1773).

Related entries & more 
adjective (n.)

"word used to qualify, limit, or define a noun or noun-like part of speech," late 14c., short for noun adjective, from Old French adjectif (14c.), from Latin adjectivum "that is added to (the noun)," neuter of adjectivus "added," past participle of adicere "throw to, fling at, throw or place (a thing) near," especially "add in addition, add by way of increase," from ad "to" (see ad-) + combining form of iacere "to throw" (from PIE root *ye- "to throw, impel"). In Britain from at least 1851 the word often was a euphemism for the taboo adjective bloody.

They ... slept until it was cool enough to go out with their 'Towny,' whose vocabulary contained less than six hundred words, and the Adjective. [Kipling, "Soldiers Three," 1888]
Related entries & more 
adjoin (v.)
Origin and meaning of adjoin

c. 1300, "unite (something to something else), ally" (a sense now obsolete); late 14c. as "be contiguous with, be adjacent to," from Old French ajoin- stem of ajoindre "join together, unite," from Latin adiungere "fasten on, harness, join to," from ad "to" (see ad-) + iungere "to bind together" (from a nasalized form of PIE root *yeug- "to join"). The meaning "be contiguous with, be in contact with" is from late 14c. The French word was Latinized 16c. to Modern French adjoindre. Related: Adjoined; adjoining.

Related entries & more 
adjourn (v.)
Origin and meaning of adjourn

mid-14c., ajournen, "assign a day, fix a day" (for convening or reconvening of an organized body), from Old French ajorner (12c.) "meet" (at an appointed time), from the phrase à jorn "to another day, to a (stated) day," from à "to" (see ad-) + journ "day," from Latin diurnus "daily," from dies "day" (from PIE root *dyeu- "to shine").

The notion is of setting a date for re-meeting. The meaning "close a meeting" (with or without intention to reconvene) is from early 15c. The sense of "go in a body to another place" (1640s) is colloquial.

The English word has had the -d- since 16c., but the spelling is unetymological, as the compound apparently is not from Latin; Middle French also occasionally has adjourner, but this was rejected in Modern French. Related: Adjourned; adjourning.

Related entries & more 

Page 54