Etymology
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sawbill (n.)

name given to several bird species with serrated bills, by 1763; see saw (n.1) + bill (n.2).

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sawbones (n.)

"surgeon," 1837 (Dickens), slang, from verbal phrase; see saw (v.) + bone (n.).

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sawbuck (n.)

"ten-dollar bill or note," also saw-buck, American English slang, 1850 (implied in double-sawbuck), so called from the resemblance of X (the Roman numeral 10, prominent in the design of many mid-19c. U.S. bank notes) to the ends of a sawhorse. Sawbuck in the sense of "sawhorse" is attested by 1837 (see saw (n.1) + buck (n.3)).

At the foot of the flag staff four saplings were erected, somewhat after the form of the two ends of a "saw-buck," and not very unlike the characters that denote the value of a ten dollar bill .... [Maumee Express, Maumee City, Ohio, Oct. 21, 1837]
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sawdust (n.)

"small particles produced by the work of a saw on wood," 1520s, from saw (n.1) + dust (n.).

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*sawel- 

*sāwel-, Proto-Indo-European root meaning "the sun." According to Watkins, the *-el- in it originally was a suffix, and there was an alternative form *s(u)wen-, with suffix *-en-, hence the two forms represented by Latin sol, English sun.

It forms all or part of: anthelion; aphelion; girasole; heliacal; helio-; heliotrope; helium; insolate; insolation; parasol; parhelion; perihelion; Sol; solar; solarium; solstice; south; southern; sun; Sunday.

It is the hypothetical source of/evidence for its existence is provided by: Sanskrit suryah, Avestan hvar "sun, light, heavens;" Greek hēlios; Latin sol "the sun, sunlight;" Lithuanian saulė, Old Church Slavonic slunice; Gothic sauil, Old English sol "sun;" Old English swegl "sky, heavens, the sun;" Welsh haul, Old Cornish heuul, Breton heol "sun;" Old Irish suil "eye;" Avestan xueng "sun;" Old Irish fur-sunnud "lighting up;" Old English sunne German Sonne, Gothic sunno "the sun."

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sawer (n.)

"one who saws," agent noun from saw (v.). Also see sawyer.

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sawfish (n.)

also saw-fish, "selachian fish having a long, flat snout with horizontal projecting teeth" (used in killing prey), 1660s; see saw (n.1.) + fish (n.).

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sawhorse (n.)

"support or rack for holding wood while it is cut by a saw," 1778, from saw (n.1) + horse (n.) in the mechanical sense.

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sawmill (n.)

"mill (originally driven by water or wind) for sawing timber into boards and planks," 1550s; see saw (n.1) + mill (n.1).

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sawn 

strong past participle of saw (v.), attested from c. 1400.

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