Etymology
Advertisement
supposed (adj.)
"believed or thought to exist," 1580s, past-participle adjective from suppose (v.); often with the -e- pronounced, to distinguish it from the passive past tense supposed, now common in the sense of "to have a duty or obligation" (1859).
Related entries & more 
Advertisement
supposedly (adv.)
"as may be supposed, presumably," 1610s, from supposed + -ly (2).
Related entries & more 
supposition (n.)
early 15c., a term in logic, "assumption, hypothesis," from Medieval Latin suppositionem (nominative suppositio) "assumption, hypothesis, a supposition," noun of action from past participle stem of supponere (see suppose); influenced by Greek hypothesis. In classical Latin, "a putting under, substitution." Earlier in English in the same sense was supposal (late 14c.). Related: Suppositional; suppositionally.
Related entries & more 
supposititious (adj.)
"put by artifice in place of another," 1610s, from Latin supposititius, from suppositus, past participle of supponere (see suppose).
Related entries & more 
suppository (n.)
late 14c., from Medieval Latin suppositorium "a suppository," noun use of neuter of Late Latin adjective suppositorius "placed underneath or up," from Latin suppositus, past participle of supponere "put or place under" (see suppose).
Related entries & more 
Advertisement
suppress (v.)

late 14c. (implied in suppressing) "be burdensome;" 1520s as "put down by force or authority," from Latin suppressus, past participle of supprimere "press down, stop, hold back, check, stifle," from assimilated form of sub "below, under" (see sub-) + premere "to press, hold fast, cover, crowd, compress" (from PIE root *per- (4) "to strike"). Sense of "prevent or prohibit the circulation of" is from 1550s of publications; medical use from 1620s. Related: Suppressed; suppressing.

Related entries & more 
suppressant (n.)
"that which suppresses," 1922, from suppress + -ant.
Related entries & more 
suppression (n.)

early 15c., from Latin suppressionem (nominative suppresio), noun of action from past-participle stem of supprimere (see suppress).

Related entries & more 
supprise (n.)
mid-15c., "injury, wrong, outrage," from supprise (v.) "overpower, subdue, put down; grieve, afflict" (c. 1400), also "take unawares, attack unexpectedly" (mid-15c.), from Anglo-French supprise, fem. past participle of supprendre, variant of sorprendre (see surprise (n.)). The noun later also had sense "oppression; surprise attack," but perhaps originally was an alternate form of surprise used in a specific sense.
Related entries & more 
suppurate (v.)
early 15c., from Latin suppuratus, past participle of suppurare "form or discharge pus" (see suppuration). Related: Suppurated; suppurating.
Related entries & more 

Page 509