Etymology
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Savannah 

port city in U.S. state of Georgia, from savana, the name applied to the Native Americans in that part of the coast by early European explorers, perhaps from a self-designation of the Shawnee Indians, or from the topographical term (see savannah).

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savant (n.)

"one eminent for learning," especially one engaged in scientific or learned research, 1719, from French savant "a learned man," noun use of adjective savant "learned, knowing," the former present participle of savoir "to know" (modern French sachant), from Vulgar Latin *sapere, from Latin sapere "be wise" (see sapient).

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savate (n.)

French method of fighting with the feet, 1862, from French savate, literally "a kind of shoe" (see sabotage).

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save (n.)

in the sports sense of "act of preventing opponent from scoring," 1890, from save (v.). The verb save in a sporting sense of "prevent the opposing side from gaining (a run, goal, etc.)" is by 1816.

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save (prep., conj.)

c. 1300, sauf, "except for" (with noun as object), "with the exception of, not including," from safe (adj.), which had save (adj.) as a variant form. The evolution parallels that of Old French sauf "safe," prepositional use of the adjective, in phrases such as saulve l'honneur "save (our) honor;" also a use in Latin (salva lege, etc.).

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save (v.)

c. 1200, saven, "to deliver from some danger; rescue from peril, bring to safety," also "prevent the death of;" also "to deliver from sin or its consequences; admit to eternal life; gain salvation," from Old French sauver "keep (safe), protect, redeem," from Late Latin salvare "make safe, secure," from Latin salvus "safe" (from PIE root *sol- "whole, well-kept").

From c. 1300 as "reserve for future use, hold back, store up instead of spending;" hence "keep possession of" (late 14c.). As a quasi-preposition from c. 1300, "without prejudice or harm to," on model of French and Latin cognates.

To save face (1898) first was used among the British community in China and is said to be from Chinese; it has not been found in Chinese, but tiu lien "to lose face" does occur. To save appearances "do something to prevent exposure, embarrassment, etc." is by 1711; earlier save (the) appearances, a term in philosophy that goes back to ancient Greek in reference to a theory which explains the observed facts.

To not (do something) to save one's life is recorded from 1848. To save (one's) breath "cease talking or arguing in a lost cause" is from 1926.

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saved (adj.)

late 14c., "delivered from damnation, destined for Heaven," past-participle adjective from save (v.). Saved by the bell is by  1902 (American English) in reference to prize fighting; 1912 in reference to the classroom; figurative use from 1915, probably at first from the fighting sense.

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saveloy (n.)

type of highly seasoned dried sausage, 1837, corruption of French cervelas, from Italian cervellata, from cervello "brain," from Latin cerebrum (see cerebral). So called because originally it was made of pigs' brains.

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saver (n.)

c. 1300, sauuer, "savior," agent noun from save (v.). Especially of Christ, God, the Virgin, "one who saves from sin and its penalties," and an alternative to saviour (see savior). By 1540s, perhaps a new formation, it had taken on the secular meaning "one who economizes," by c. 1600, that of "one who rescues from destruction or death," and by 1660s that of "means of saving" (as in time-saver, attested in U.S. advertisements by 1836). OED print notes saver as "now only used when saviour would seem inappropriate." 

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Saville Row 

also Savile Row, fashionable street in London, noted for its tailors' shops since at least 1870; hence, metonymically, "fashionable tailoring," by 1893. The street name itself dates to mid-18c. and is named for the aristocratic family that formerly had an estate nearby. It was a fashionable neighborhood early 19c., which might have attracted the tailors.

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