Etymology
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garth (n.)
"small piece of enclosed ground," a northern and western English dialect word, mid-14c., from Old Norse garðr "yard, courtyard, fence," cognate of Old English geard "fenced enclosure," from PIE root *gher- (1) "to grasp, enclose."
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menagerie (n.)

"collection of wild animals kept in captivity," 1712, from French ménagerie "housing for domestic animals, yard or enclosure in which wild animals are kept" (16c.), from Old French manage "household" (see menage).

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parrel (n.)

late 15c., pariel, "rope or chain that fixes the middle of a yard to a mast," from parel "equipment" (c. 1400), earlier "apparel" (early 14c.), a shortening of apparel (n.).

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front (adj.)
"relating to the front," 1610s, from front (n.). Front yard first attested 1767; front door is from 1807. The newspaper front page is attested from 1892; as an adjective in reference to sensational news, 1907.
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rockpile (n.)

also rock-pile, "heap of stones," originally and especially one in a prison yard that convicts are tasked with breaking into smaller stones, 1888, from rock (n.1) + pile (n.1).

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Asgard (n.)

in Norse religion, the home of the gods and goddesses and of heroes slain in battle, from Old Norse, from āss "god," which is related to Old English os, Gothic ans "god" (see Aesir) + garðr "enclosure, yard, garden" (from PIE root *gher- (1) "to grasp, enclose").

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commission (v.)

1660s, "empower or authorize by commission," from commission (n.). In the naval sense, of persons, "be given the rank of an officer (by commission from authority)," from 1793; of a ship, "to be transferred from the naval yard and placed in the command of the officer put in charge of it," 1796. Related: Commissioned; commissioning.

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plantain (n.2)

"common yard weed of the genus Plantago," with large, spreading leaves close to the ground and slender spikes, c. 1300, planteine, from Anglo-French plaunteyne, Old French plantain, from Latin plantaginem (nominative plantago), the common weed, from planta "sole of the foot" (see plant (n.)); so called from its flat leaves.

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shanty (n.1)

"rough cabin, hut, mean dwelling," 1820, said to be from Canadian French chantier "lumberjack's headquarters," in French, "timber-yard, dock," from Old French chantier "gantry," from Latin cantherius "rafter, frame" (see gantry). Shanty Irish in reference to the Irish underclass in the U.S., is from 1928 (title of a book by Jim Tully).

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Elmo 

in St. Elmo's Fire "corposant," name given by seamen to the brushes and jets of electric light seen on the tips of masts and yard-arms, especially in storms, 1560s, from Italian fuoco di Sant'Elmo, named for the patron saint of Mediterranean sailors, a corruption of the name of St. Erasmus, an Italian bishop said to have been martyred in 303 who was invoked in the Mediterranean by sailors during storms.

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