Etymology
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mangle (v.)

"to mutilate, to hack or cut by random, repeated blows," c. 1400, from Anglo-French mangler, frequentative of Old French mangoner "cut to pieces," a word of uncertain origin, perhaps connected with Old French mahaignier "to maim, mutilate, wound" (see maim). The figurative meaning "to destroy the symmetry or completeness of" is from early 15c.; as "to mispronounce (words), garble," from 1530s. Related: Mangled; mangler; mangling.

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lesion (n.)
early 15c., "damage, injury," from Old French lesion "hurt, offense, wrong, injury, wound" (12c.), from Latin laesionem (nominative laesio) "a hurting, injuring, personal attack," noun of action from past participle stem of laedere "to strike, hurt, damage," a word of unknown origin with no certain cognates. Originally in English with reference to any sort of hurt, whether physical or not.
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pern (v.)

"to move with a winding motion," a word used in poetry by Yeats from c. 1920, probably from a variant of dialectal pirn (n.) "small cylinder on which thread or yarn is wound (mid-15c.), which seems to have survived in dialects in Celtic parts of Britain. It is perhaps from prin "a twig, shoot of a tree" (c.1400), itself a variant of prene "a nail, spike," from Old English preon.

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foment (v.)
early 15c., "apply hot liquids," from Old French fomenter "apply hot compress (to a wound)" (13c.), from Late Latin fomentare, from Latin fomentum "warm application, poultice," contraction of *fovimentum, from fovere "to warm; cherish, encourage" (see fever). Extended sense of "stimulate, instigate" (1620s), on the notion of "encourage the growth of," as if by heat, probably was taken from French. Related: Fomented; fomenting.
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contusion (n.)

c. 1400, "act of beating or bruising; a bruise, an injury to the body without apparent wound or fracture," from Latin contusionem (nominative contusio) "a crushing, breaking, battering," in medical language, "a bruise," noun of action from past-participle stem of contundere "to beat, bruise, grind, crush, break to pieces," from assimilated form of com-, here perhaps an intensive prefix (see com-), + tundere "to beat" (see obtuse).

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penetration (n.)

early 15c., penetracioun, "a puncture, a penetrating wound," from Latin penetrationem (nominative penetratio) "a penetrating or piercing," noun of action from past-participle stem of penetrare "to put or get into, enter into" (see penetrate). From c. 1600 as "insight, discernment, shrewdness;"  the sexual sense is attested from 1610s; meaning "act of penetrating or piercing" is from 1620s; in optics, by 1799.

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conglutinate (v.)

early 15c., "to fasten together," also, of a broken bone or wound, "to heal, close up," from Latin conglutinatus, past participle of conglutinare, from assimilated form of com "together" (see con-) + glutinare "to glue," from gluten "glue," from PIE *glei- "clay," also forming words with a sense of "to stick together" (see clay). Intransitive sense of "to adhere" is from 1620s. Related: Conglutinated; conglutinating; conglutination.

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rabble (n.2)

"iron bar, bent at right angles at one end, for stirring molten metal," 1864, from French râble, from Old French roable, from Latin rutabulum "rake, fire shovel" (in Medieval Latin also rotabulum), from ruere "to churn or plow up, dig out," (from PIE *reuo-, source also of  Sanskrit ravisam, ravat "to wound, hurt;" Lithuanian ráuti "to tear out, pull," ravėti "to weed;" Russian ryt'i, roju "to dig," Old Church Slavonic rylo "spade," Old Norse ryja "to tear out wool," German roden "to root out").

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salve (v.1)

"apply medicinal or sacramental ointment to," Middle English salven, from Old English sealfian "anoint (a wound) with salve," from Proto-Germanic *salbojanan (source also of Dutch zalven, Old Frisian salva, German salben, Gothic salbon "to anoint"), from the root of salve (n.).

Figurative use is by late 12c. in reference to sin or vice; the non-religious sense of "to help, remedy, atone for" is by 1570s. Related: Salved; salving.

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rankle (v.)

c. 1300, ranclen, of a sore, wound, etc., "to fester," from Old French rancler, earlier raoncler, draoncler "to suppurate, run," from draoncle "abscess, festering sore," from Medieval Latin dracunculus, literally "little dragon," diminutive of Latin draco "serpent, dragon" (see dragon). According to OED (citing Skeat and also Godefroy's "Dictionnaire De L'ancienne Langue Française"), the notion is of an ulcer caused by a snake's bite. Transitive meaning "cause to fester" is from c. 1400. Figurative use, of feelings, etc., is from 16c. Related: Rankled; rankling.

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