Etymology
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eso- 
word-forming element meaning" within," from Greek eso "within" (see esoteric).
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oro- 
word-forming element meaning "mountain," from Greek oros "mountain" (see oread).
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extro- 
word-forming element meaning "outwards," a variant of extra- by influence of intro-.
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magneto- 
word-forming element meaning "magnetic, magnetism," from Greek magneto-, combining form of magnes (see magnet).
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actino- 

before vowels actin-, word-forming element meaning "pertaining to rays," from Latinized form of Greek aktis (genitive aktinos) "ray of light, beam of light; spoke of a wheel;" a word of unknown etymology. It is perhaps cognate with Sanskrit aktuh "light, ray," Gothic uhtwo "dawn, daybreak," Lithuanian anksti "early" [Beekes].

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bryo- 
word-forming element meaning "moss" in scientific compounds, from Greek bryos, bryon "moss."
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sphygmo- 
word-forming element meaning "pulse," from Greek sphygmos "a pulse," from sphyzein "to throb, pulse, beat."
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cerebro- 

word-forming element meaning "brain, of the brain and," from Latin cerebrum "the brain" (see cerebral).

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xylo- 
before vowels xyl-, word forming element meaning "wood," from Greek xylon "wood cut and ready for use, firewood, timber; piece of wood; stocks, a plank, beam, or bench," in New Testament, "the Cross," a word of uncertain origin. It seems to correspond with Lithuanian šulas "post, pole, stave," Russian šulo "garden-pole," Serbo-Croatian šulj "block," Old High German sul "style, pole," Gothic sauls "pillar," but the exact relationship is unclear, and Beekes asks, "Was the word taken from a non-IE substrate language?"
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circum- 

word-forming element meaning "around, round about, all around, on all sides," from Latin adverb and preposition circum "around, round about," literally "in a circle," probably accusative form of circus "ring" (see circus). The Latin word was commonly used in word-formation. In French, the element became circon-; Kitchin points out that con for cum is common even in classical Latin. For sense development, compare German rings "around."

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