Etymology
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mistress (n.)

c. 1300, "female teacher, governess; supervisor of novices in a convent," from Old French maistresse "mistress (lover); housekeeper; governess, female teacher" (Modern French maîtresse), fem. of maistre "master," from Latin magister "chief, head, director, teacher" (see master (n.)).

Sense of "a woman who employs others or has authority over a household and servants" is from early 15c. Meaning "woman who has mastered an art or branch of study" is from mid-15c. Sense of "kept woman of a married man" is from early 15c. As a polite form of address to a woman, mid-15c. Meaning "woman who is beloved and courted, one who has command over a lover's heart" is from c. 1500.

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duenna (n.)

1660s, "chief lady in waiting upon the queen of Spain," also "an elderly woman in charge of girls from a Spanish family," from Spanish dueña "married lady, mistress" (fem. of dueño "master"), from Latin domina "lady, mistress of the house," from Latin domus "house" (from PIE root *dem- "house, household"). Sense extended in English to "any elderly woman chaperon of a younger woman" (1708).

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tart (n.2)

1887, "prostitute, immoral woman," from earlier use as a term of endearment to a girl or woman (1864), sometimes said to be a shortening of sweetheart. But another theory traces it to jam-tart (see tart (n.1)), which was British slang early 19c. for "attractive woman." Diminutive tartlet attested from 1890. To tart (something) up is from 1938. Related: Tarted.

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waitress (n.)

"woman who waits tables at a restaurant," 1834, from waiter + -ess.

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maness (n.)

"woman as the feminine of man," 1590s, from man (n.) + -ess.

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Doris 

fem. proper name, Greek, "Dorian woman" (see Dorian).

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au pair (n.)

1897 of the arrangement whereby a young woman from abroad helps with housework or child care in exchange for room and board; by 1960 in reference to the woman; French, literally "on an equal footing" (see au + pair (n.)).

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she-devil (n.)

"difficult woman," 1840, from she + devil (n.). Deviless "female devil" is from 1640s.

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babelicious (adj.)

1991, from babe in the "attractive young woman" sense + ending from delicious.

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cutie (n.)

"cute person," originally especially "attractive young woman," 1917, from diminutive of cute.

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