Etymology
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must (n.1)

"new wine," Old English must, from Latin mustum (also source of Old High German, German most, Old French moust, Modern French moût, Spanish, Italian mosto), short for vinum mustum "fresh wine," neuter of mustus "fresh, new, newborn," perhaps literally "wet," and from PIE *mus-to-, from root *meus- "damp" (see moss).

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zinfandel (n.)

1896, "red or white dry California wine," origin uncertain; used earlier as the name of the grape from which it was made (1880). The wine itself is said to have been known in U.S. since 1829. Some wine experts suggest a corruption of the Austrian grape name Zierfandler, though these grapes are not related to those of zinfandel. According to a now-extinct internet article (formerly at http://ww3.stratsplace.com/):

The similarity in the names Zinfandel and Zierfandler arouses some speculation. Modern vine identification systems did not yet exist in 1829, so it is conceivable that the cuttings George Gibbs imported to the USA had never been correctly identified in Austria.
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pinot (n.)

type of grape vine used in wine-making, 1912, American English variant spelling of French pineau (attested in English from 1763), name of a family of wine grapes, from pin "pine tree" (see pine (n.)) + diminutive suffix -eau. So called from the shape of the grape clusters. Variants are pinot noir, "black," pinot blanc, "white," and pinot gris, "gray."

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Xeres 

Andalusian town (modern Jerez) famous for its wine; see sherry. For first letter, see xebec.

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sec (adj.)

of wine, "dry," 1863, an English use of French sec (10c.), from Latin siccus "dry" (also source of Italian secco); see siccative.

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cognac (n.)

1590s, Conniacke wine, "wine produced in Cognac," the region in western France. The sense of "brandy of a superior quality distilled from wines produced in the Cognac region" is from 1680s as Cognac brandy; by 1755 simply as Cognac. Also sometimes used generally of any brandy of good quality. The place name is from Medieval Latin Comniacum, from the personal name Cominius and the Gallo-Roman suffix -acum.

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spumante (n.)

sparkling white wine from Asti in Piedmont, 1908, from Italian spumante, literally "sparkling," from spuma "foam, froth" (see spume).

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red ink (n.)

"financial losses, the debit side of an account," 1929, from the red ink traditionally used to indicate debits in accounts. Earlier, "cheap wine" (1919).

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Dennis 

masc. proper name, from French Denis, ultimately from Latin Dionysius, name of an important 6c. Church father, from Greek Dionysos, god of wine and revelry.

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slough (n.2)

"cast-off skin" (of a snake or other animal), early 14c., slughe, slouh, probably related to Old Saxon sluk "skin of a snake," Middle High German sluch "snakeskin, wine-skin," Middle Low German slu "husk, peel, skin," German Schlauch "wine-skin;" from Proto-Germanic *sluk-, of uncertain origin, perhaps from PIE root *sleug- "to glide."

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