Etymology
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wink (v.)
Old English wincian "to blink, wink, close one's eyes quickly," from Proto-Germanic *wink- (source also of Dutch winken, Old High German winkan "move sideways, stagger; nod," German winken "to wave, wink"), a gradational variant of the root of Old High German wankon "to stagger, totter," Old Norse vakka "to stray, hover," from PIE root *weng- "to bend, curve." The meaning "close an eye as a hint or signal" is first recorded c. 1100; that of "close one's eyes (to fault or irregularity)" first attested late 15c. Related: Winked; winking.
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winkle (n.)
edible mollusk, 1580s, shortening of periwinkle (n.2).
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Rip Van Winkle 

"person out of touch with current conditions," 1829, the name of the character in Washington Irving's popular Catskills tale (published 1819) of the henpecked husband who sleeps enchanted for 20 years and finds the world has forgotten him.

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windhover (n.)
"kestrel," 1670s, from wind (n.1) + hover; so called from the bird's habit of hovering in the wind. Among the many early names for it was windfucker (1590s).
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windrow (n.)
1520s, from wind (n.1) + row (n.). Because it is exposed to the wind for drying.
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windward (adj.)
"on the side toward which the wind blows," 1540s, from wind (n.1) + -ward.
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wind (n.2)
"an act of winding round," 1825, from wind (v.1) . Earlier, "an apparatus for winding," late 14c., in which use perhaps from a North Sea Germanic word, such as Middle Dutch, Middle Low German winde "windlass."
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winter (v.)
"to pass the winter (in some place)," late 14c., from winter (n.). Related: Wintered; wintering.
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winch (v.)
"to hoist with a winch," 1520s, from winch (n.). Related: Winched; winching.
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