Etymology
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megatherium (n.)

type of large, extinct, herbivorous mammal related to the sloth, 1799, a Latin compound from Greek elements; see mega- "great" + ther- "wild beast."

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harvest (v.)

c. 1400, from harvest (n.). Of wild animals, by 1946; of cells, from 1946. Related: Harvested; harvesting.

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mustang (n.)

"small, half-wild horse of the American prairie and pampas," 1808, from Mexican Spanish mestengo "animal that strays" (16c.), from Spanish mestengo "wild, stray, ownerless," literally "belonging to the mesta," an association of cattle ranchers who divided stray or unclaimed animals that got "mixed" with the herds, from Latin mixta "mixed," fem. past participle of miscere "to mix" (from PIE root *meik- "to mix").

Said to be influenced by the Spanish word mostrenco "straying, wild," which is probably from mostrar, from Latin monstrare "to show." Though now feral, the animals are descended from tame horses brought to the Americas by the Spaniards. The brand of automobile was introduced by Ford in 1962.

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cimarron (n.)

"bighorn, Rocky Mountain sheep," 1850, from American Spanish, from an adjective, literally "wild, unruly;" see maroon (v.). 

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coltish (adj.)

late 14c., "wild, frisky," also in early use "lustful, lewd," from colt + -ish. Literal sense of "pertaining to a colt" is recorded from 1540s. Related: Coltishly.

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boondocks (n.)

"remote and wild place," 1910s, from Tagalog bundok "mountain." A word adopted by occupying American soldiers in the Philippines for "remote and wild place." It was reinforced or re-adopted during World War II. Hence, also boondockers "shoes suited for rough terrain," originally (1944) U.S. services slang word for field boots.

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hip (n.2)

"seed pod" (especially of wild rose), a 16c. alteration of Middle English hepe, from Old English heope, hiope "seed vessel of the wild rose," from Proto-Germanic *hiup- (source also of dialectal Norwegian hjupa, Old Saxon hiopo, Dutch joop, Old High German hiafo, dialectal German Hiefe, Old English hiopa "briar, bramble"), of unknown origin.

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ibex (n.)

"chamois, wild goat of the Alps and Apennines," c. 1600, from Latin ibex, which probably is from a pre-Latin Alpine language. The German Steinbock.

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bird-bath (n.)

also birdbath, "small basin filled with water, placed in a garden, etc. for wild birds to drink from and bathe in," 1862, from bird (n.1) + bath (n.).

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wildness (n.)

early 14c., "unrestrained behavior," from wild (adj.) + -ness. Late 14c. as "frenzy;" mid-15c. as "undomesticated state."

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