Etymology
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gander (v.)
"take a long look," slang, 1886, from gander (n.) on the notion of craning one's neck like a goose; earlier it meant "to wander foolishly" (1680s). Related: Gandered; gandering.
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smorgasbord (n.)

1893, from Swedish smörgåsbord, literally "butter-goose table," from smörgås, "slice of bread and butter," compounded from smör "butter" (see smear (n.)) and gås, literally "goose" (and from the same Germanic root that yielded English goose (n.)).

[Smörgås] properly signifies "a slice of bread-and-butter"; and has come by custom—in much the same way as when we familiarly speak of "taking a sandwich" for partaking of some light refreshment—to be applied synecdochically to the preliminary relish or appetizer partaken of before meals. [Notes and Queries, Nov. 15, 1884]

The final element is bord "table," from Proto-Germanic *burdam "plank, board, table" (see board (n.1)). Figurative sense of "medley, miscellany" is recorded from 1948.

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ther- 

often thero-, word-forming element meaning "beast," from Greek thēr "wild beast, beast of prey," from PIE root *ghwer- "wild beast." Also therio-, from Greek thērion "wild animal, hunted animal."

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ferocious (adj.)

1640s, from Latin ferocis, oblique case of ferox "fierce, wild-looking," from ferus "wild" (from PIE root *ghwer- "wild beast") + -ox (genitive -ocis), a suffix meaning "looking or appearing" (cognate with Greek ōps "eye, sight;" from PIE root *okw- "to see"). Alternative ferocient (1650s) is seldom seen. Related: Ferociously; ferociousness.

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wah-wah 
1926, in jazz slang, in reference to the effect on brass instruments made by manipulating the mute; of imitative origin. Later also in reference to an electric guitar effect. As an imitation of the sound of a baby crying, it is recorded from 1938. Wah-wah pedal is recorded from 1969. Compare Chinook jargon wawa "talk, speak, call, ask, sermon, language;" Cree (Algonquian) wehwew "goose," Lenape (Algonquian) wava "snow goose," all probably of imitative origin.
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*ghwer- 

Proto-Indo-European root meaning "wild beast."

It forms all or part of: baluchitherium; feral; ferine; ferocious; ferocity; fierce; ther-; Theropoda; treacle.

It is the hypothetical source of/evidence for its existence is provided by: Latin ferus "wild, untamed;" Greek thēr, Old Church Slavonic zveri, Lithuanian žvėris "wild beast."

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mallard (n.)

c. 1300, "wild drake or duck," from Old French malart (12c.) or Medieval Latin mallardus, apparently from male, from Latin masculus (see male), in which case the original sense probably was not of a specific species but of any male wild duck, though the specific sense of "male of the wild duck" is not attested in English until early 14c.

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womanize (v.)
1590s, "to make effeminate," from woman + -ize. Sense of "to chase women, to go wenching" is attested from 1893. Related: Womanized; womanizer; womanizing.
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Menominee 

also Menomini, Algonquian people of Wisconsin, also of their language, from Ojibwa (Algonquian) Manoominii, literally "wild rice people," from manoomin "wild rice." Not their name for themselves.

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pursual (n.)

"act of pursuit, pursuance," 1786, from pursue + -al (2). Earlier was pursuance and the verbal noun pursuing "action of giving chase" (late 14c.).

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