Etymology
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stripling (n.)
"a youth," late 14c., of uncertain origin, possibly from strip (n.1) "long, narrow piece," on the notion of "one who is slender as a strip, whose figure is not yet filled out" + -ling.
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Thompson (n.)
type of sub-machine gun, 1919, named for U.S. Gen. John T. Thompson (1860-1940), who conceived it and whose company financed it. Familiarly Tommy gun by 1929.
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disciplinant (n.)

1610s, "one who subjects himself to a course of discipline," from Spanish Disciplinantes, name of a former religious order whose members scourged themselves in public, from Latin disciplina (see discipline (n.)).

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Reims 

city in northeastern France, named for the Remi, a Gaulish people whose name is said to mean "dominant ones." The former French spelling was with an Rh- (compare Rhemish).

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Ghana 
since 1957 the name of the former Gold Coast; from the name of a former tribal chieftain, whose name itself is a form of a royal title, hence, "king." Related: Ghanian.
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largesse (n.)

also largess, "willingness to give or spend freely; munificence," c. 1200, from Old French largesse, largece "a bounty, munificence," from Vulgar Latin *largitia "abundance" (source also of Spanish largueza, Italian larghezza), from Latin largus "abundant, large, liberal" (see large). In medieval theology, "the virtue whose opposite is avarice, and whose excess is prodigality" [The Middle English Compendium]. For Old French suffix -esse, compare fortress. Related: Largation.

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teddy bear (n.)

1906, named for U.S. president Theodore "Teddy" Roosevelt (1858-1919), a noted big-game hunter, whose conservationist fervor inspired a comic illustrated poem in the New York Times of Jan. 7, 1906, about two bears named Teddy, whose names were transferred to two bears presented to the Bronx Zoo that year. The name was picked up by toy dealers in 1907 for a line of "Roosevelt bears" imported from Germany. Meaning "big, lovable person" first attested 1957, from the song popularized by Elvis Presley.

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spherical (adj.)
1520s, from sphere + -ical. Related: Spherically. A spherical number (1640s) is one whose powers always terminate in the same digit as the number itself (5, 6, and 10 are the only ones).
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box-cutter (n.)
1871, "one whose job is to cut boxes," from box (n.1) + cutter. From 1890 as a type of cutting machine; from 1944 as a hand-held bladed tool for cutting cardboard.
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goatherd (n.)
"one whose occupation is the care of goats," early 13c. (as a surname), from or replacing Old English gat-hyrde (West Saxon); see goat + herd (n.).
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