Etymology
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auntie (n.)

1787, also aunty, familiar diminutive form of aunt. It also was a form of kindly address to an older woman to whom one is not related, originally in southern U.S., of elderly slave women.

The negro no longer submits with grace to be called "uncle" or "auntie" as of yore. [Harper's Magazine, October 1883]
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Rhodes scholar (n.)

holder of any of the scholarships founded at Oxford in 1902 by British financier and imperialist Cecil Rhodes (1853-1902), for whom the former African colony of Rhodesia (later Zimbabwe) also was named. The surname is literally "dweller by a clearing," from Old English rodu "plot of land of one square rod." Related: Rhodesia; Rhodesian.

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Ogygian (adj.)

"of great antiquity or age," 1809, from Greek Ōgygos, Ōgygēs, Ōgygios, name of a mythical king of Attica or Boeotia (or both) of whom nothing is known and who even in classical times was thought to have lived very long ago. Also sometimes with reference to a famous flood said to have occurred in his day.

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Japhetic (adj.)
in reference to the presumed ancestral language of ancient Greek, Latin, and most of the modern European ones, 1730, from Biblical Japheth, a son of Noah, from whom the European peoples once were popularly supposed to have descended (as Middle Eastern Semitic from Shem; African Hamitic from Ham). Compare Aryan. Related: Japhetian (1752).
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Lazarus 
Biblical character (Luke xvi.20), the poor man covered in sores; his name was extended in medieval usage to "any poor and visibly diseased person" (compare lazar, mid-14c., "one deformed and nauseous with filthy and pestilential diseases" [Johnson]). The name is from a Greek rendition of Hebrew El'azar, literally "(he whom) God has helped."
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magdalen (n.)

"reformed prostitute," 1690s, in reference to "Mary called Magdalene out of whom went seven devils," disciple of Christ (Luke viii.2), who often is identified (especially since 5c. and especially in the Western Church) with the unnamed penitent "woman in the city, which was a sinner" in Luke vii.37-50. See Magdalene.

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misfit (n.)

1823, originally slang, "garment or suit of clothes which does not fit the person for whom it was intended;" see mis- (1) "bad, wrong" + fit (n.1). Hence anything that fails of its intended effect; the meaning "person who does not fit his environment" is attested by 1880.

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padre (n.)

"priest, chaplain," used in reference to priests in Spain, Italy, and Mexico and South America, or the southwest of the U.S., 1580s, from Italian, Spanish, or Portuguese padre, from Latin patrem (nominative pater) "father" (see father (n.)). The title of the regular clergy in those languages. Papar was the name the Norse arriving in Iceland gave to Irish monks whom they found there.

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quo warranto 

mid-15c. (late 13c. in Anglo-French), "royal writ to determine by what warrant a person holds an office or franchise," a Medieval Latin legal phrase, literally "by what warrant," from quo "from, with, or by whom or what?," ablative of the interrogative pronoun quis "who?" (from PIE root *kwo-, stem of relative and interrogative pronouns). Also see warrant (n.).

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jurat (n.)
also jurate, "one who has taken an oath," early 15c. (mid-14c. in Anglo-French), from Medieval Latin iuratus "sworn man," noun use of past participle of Latin iurare "to swear" (see jury (n.)). Meaning "official memorandum at the end of an affidavit" (showing when and before whom it was sworn) is from 1796, from Latin iuratum, noun use of the neuter past participle.
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