Etymology
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toto caelo 
Latin, "by the whole heaven."
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clothier (n.)

"maker or seller of cloth or clothes," mid-14c., clother; late 15c., clothyer (late 13c. as a surname), Middle English agent noun from cloth; also see -ier, which is unetymological in this word and probably acquired by bad influence.

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entire (adj.)

mid-14c., of things, "whole, intact," from Old French entier "whole, unbroken, intact, complete," from Latin integrum "completeness" (nominative integer; see integer). Related: Entireness.

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draper (n.)

late 14c. (mid-14c. in Anglo-French; mid-12c. as a surname), "one who weaves and/or sells cloth," from Anglo-French draper, Old French drapier (13c.) "draper, clothes-seller, clothes-maker," agent noun from drap "cloth" (see drape (v.)).

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sackcloth (n.)

"coarse textile fabric worn as penitential or grieving garb," late 13c., literally "cloth of which sacks are made," from sack (n.1) + cloth. In the Bible it was of goats' or camels' hair, the coarsest used for clothing.

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in toto (adv.)
Latin, "as a whole, wholly, completely, utterly, entirely," from toto, ablative of totus "whole, entire" (see total (adj.)); "always or nearly always with verbs of negative sense" [Fowler].
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gabardine (n.)
1590s, "dress, covering," variant of gaberdine. Meaning "closely woven cloth" is from 1904.
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duck (n.2)

"strong, untwilled linen (later cotton) fabric," used for sails and sailors' clothing, 1630s, from Dutch doeck "linen cloth" (Middle Dutch doec), from Proto-Germanic *dōkaz, a word of uncertain etymology (source also of German Tuch "piece of cloth," Danish dug, Old Frisian dok, Old High German tuoh).

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total (n.)
"whole amount, sum," 1550s, from total (adj.).
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integer (n.)

"a whole number" (as opposed to a fraction), 1570s, from noun use of Latin integer (adj.) "intact, whole, complete," figuratively, "untainted, upright," literally "untouched," from in- "not" (see in- (1)) + root of tangere "to touch" (from PIE root *tag- "to touch, handle"). The word was used earlier in English as an adjective in the Latin sense, "whole, entire" (c. 1500).

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