Etymology
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dissembler (n.)

"one who conceals his opinions, character, etc., under a false appearance, one who pretends that a thing which is is not," 1520s, agent noun from dissemble. "A dissembler is one who tries to conceal what he is; a hypocrite, one who tries to make himself appear to be what he is not, especially to seem better than he is." [Century Dictionary]

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overeducated (adj.)

also over-educated, "educated to excess or too long or beyond what is necessary," 1788, from over- + educated.

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whereby (adv.)

"by what, by which," c. 1200, from where (in the sense of "in which position or circumstances") + by.

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Anglophobia (n.)
"intense hatred or fear of England or what is English," 1793 (Jefferson), from Anglo- + -phobia. Related: Anglophobe; Anglophobic (adj.); Anglophobiac (n.).
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inadequate (adj.)

"not equal to what is required, insufficient to effect the end desired," 1670s; see in- (1) "not, opposite of" + adequate. Related: Inadequately.

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keypunch (n.)
1933, from keyboard (which operated it) + punch (v.), which is what it did to the cards inserted in it to record data.
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problematic (adj.)

c. 1600, "doubtful, questionable, uncertain, unsettled," from French problematique (15c.), from Late Latin problematicus, from Greek problēmatikos "pertaining to a problem," from problēmatos, genitive of problēma (see problem).

Specific sense in logic, differentiating what is possible from what is necessarily true, is from 1610s. The sense of "constituting, containing, or causing a difficulty" is modern, probably from a noun use in sociology (1957). Related: Problematical (1560s); problematically.

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oddness (n.)

late 14c., oddenesse, "unevenness of number," from odd + -ness. Meaning "strangeness, queerness, divergence from what is ordinary or useful" is from 1610s.

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preterhuman (adj.)

"more than human, beyond what is human," 1803, from preter- "beyond" + human (adj.). Used to avoid the specific connotations of superhuman.

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preternuptial (adj.)

"beyond what is permitted by the marriage tie or vow," hence, euphemistically, "adulterous," 1833 (Carlyle), from preter- "beyond" + nuptial.

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