Etymology
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salubrious (adj.)

"favorable to health, wholesome," 1540s, from Latin salubris "promoting health, healthful," from salus (genitive salutis) "welfare, health" (from PIE root *sol- "whole, well-kept"). Originally of foods, medicine; in reference to air, climate, etc., by 1610s. Related: Salubriously; salubriousness.

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hologram (n.)

1949, coined by Hungarian-born British scientist Dennis Gabor (Gábor Dénes), 1971 Nobel prize winner in physics for his work in holography; from Greek holos "whole" (here in sense of "three-dimensional;" from PIE root *sol- "whole, well-kept") + -gram.

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salvific (adj.)

"tending to save or make secure," 1590s, from Latin salvificus "saving," from salvus "uninjured, in good health, safe" (from PIE root *sol- "whole, well-kept") + -ficus "making, doing," from combining form of facere "to make, do" (from PIE root *dhe- "to set, put"). Related: Salvifical (1580s).

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repressed (adj.)

1660s, "restrained, checked," past-participle adjective from repress (v.). Psychological sense of "kept out of the conscious mind, kept in the subconscious" is attested by 1904.

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holograph (n.)

"document written entirely by the person from whom it proceeds," 1620s, from Late Latin holographus, from Greek holographos "written entirely by the same hand," literally "written in full," from holos "whole" (from PIE root *sol- "whole, well-kept") + graphos "written," from graphein "to write" (see -graphy). Modern use, with reference to holograms, is a 1960s back-formation from holography.

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salutary (adj.)

"wholesome, healthful, healing," late 15c. (Caxton), from Old French salutaire "beneficial," or directly from Latin salutaris "healthful," from salus (genitive salutis) "good health" (from PIE root *sol- "whole, well-kept"). By 19c. also in a general sense, "contributing to some beneficial purpose." Earlier as a noun, salutari, "a remedy," (early 15c.), from Latin salutaris (n.).

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keepsake (n.)

"anything kept or given to be kept for the sake of the giver; a token of friendship," 1790, from keep (v.) + sake (n.1); an unusual formation on model of namesake; thus an object kept for the sake of the giver. The word was used c. 1830s in titles of popular holiday gift books containing beautiful engravings and mediocre poetry. As an adjective by 1839.

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menagerie (n.)

"collection of wild animals kept in captivity," 1712, from French ménagerie "housing for domestic animals, yard or enclosure in which wild animals are kept" (16c.), from Old French manage "household" (see menage).

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night-watch (n.)
"guard kept during the night," late Old English; see night + watch (n.).
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holism (n.)

1926, apparently coined by South African Gen. J.C. Smuts (1870-1950) in his book "Holism and Evolution" which treats of evolution as a process of unification of separate parts; from Greek holos "whole" (from PIE root *sol- "whole, well-kept") + -ism.

This character of "wholeness" meets us everywhere and points to something fundamental in the universe. Holism (from [holos] = whole) is the term here coined for this fundamental factor operative towards the creation of wholes in the universe. [Smuts, "Holism and Evolution," p.86]
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