Etymology
Advertisement
centigram (n.)

also centigramme, metric measure of weight, "one hundredth of a gram," 1801, from French centigramme; see centi- + gram.

Related entries & more 
Advertisement
lightening (n.)
"the shedding of light," mid-14c., verbal noun from lighten (v.2). Meaning "alleviation of weight" (literal and figurative) is from 1520s, from lighten (v.1).
Related entries & more 
ponderance (n.)

"weight, gravity, importance," 1798, from ponder + -ance or Latin ponderantem. Ponderment as "the act of weighing (something) in the mind" is by 1763.

Related entries & more 
peseta (n.)

silver coin of Spain and some Spanish-American countries, 1811, from Spanish peseta, a diminutive of pesa "weight," from Medieval Latin pensum (see peso).

Related entries & more 
imponderable (adj.)
1794, "weightless," from assimilated form of in- (1) "not, opposite of" + ponderable (see ponder). Figurative use, "unthinkable," from 1814. As a noun from 1829, originally meaning heat, light, electricity, etc., as having no weight. Related: Imponderably; imponderability. Imponderous is attested from 1640s as "without weight." Imponderabilia "unthinkable things collectively" is attested from 1835.
Related entries & more 
Advertisement
levity (n.)
1560s, "want of seriousness, frivolity," from French levite, from Latin levitatem (nominative levitas) "lightness," literal and figurative; "light-mindedness, frivolity," from levis "light" in weight, from PIE root *legwh- "not heavy, having little weight." In old science (16c.-17c.), the name of a force or property of physical bodies, the opposite of gravity, causing them to tend to rise.
Related entries & more 
gram (n.)
also gramme, metric unit of weight, 1797, from French gramme (18c.), from Late Latin gramma "small weight," from Greek gramma "small weight," a special use of the classical word meaning "a letter of the alphabet" (see -gram). Adopted into English about two years before it was established in France as a unit in the metric system by law of 19 frimaire, year VIII (1799). "There seems to be no possible objection to adopting the more convenient shorter form, except that the -me records the unimportant fact that the word came to us through French" [Fowler].
Related entries & more 
outweigh (v.)

"exceed in weight, be heavier than," also figurative, "surpass in gravity or importance," 1590s, from out- + weigh (v.). Related: Outweighed; outweighing.

Related entries & more 
bar (n.4)

unit of pressure, coined 1903 from Greek baros "weight," which is related to barys "heavy," from PIE root *gwere- (1) "heavy."

Related entries & more 
drachma (n.)

late 14c., dragme, "ancient Athenian coin," the principal silver coin of ancient Greece;  mid-15c. as the name of a coin used in Syria, from Old French dragme, from Medieval Latin dragma, from Latinized form of Greek drakhme, an Attic coin and weight, probably originally "a handful" (of six obols, the least valuable coins in ancient Athens), akin to drassesthai "to grasp," a word of uncertain origin, perhaps Pre-Greek.  Arabic dirham, Armenian dram are from Greek.

Middle English also used the word in the "weight" sense, as a unit of apothecary's weight of one-eighth of an ounce, which became dram.

Related entries & more 

Page 5