Etymology
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lacquer (n.)
1570s, "dye obtained from lac;" 1670s as "gold-colored solution of shellac," from obsolete French lacre, name for a kind of sealing wax, from Portuguese lacre, unexplained variant of lacca "resinous substance," from Arabic lakk, from Persian lak (see lac).
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skylight (n.)
1670s, "light from the sky," from sky (n.) + light (n.). Meaning "small opening in a roof to admit light" is recorded from 1680s. Related: Sky-lit.
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luminous (adj.)
early 15c., "full of light, shiny," from Latin luminosus "shining, full of light, conspicuous," from lumen (genitive luminis) "light," from suffixed form of PIE root *leuk- "light, brightness." Related: Luminously; luminousness.
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sidelight (n.)
also side-light, c. 1600, "light coming from the side," from side (adj.) + light (n.). Figurative meaning "incidental information on a subject" is attested from 1862.
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luminary (n.)
mid-15c., "lamp, light-giver, source of light," from Old French luminarie (12c.), "lamp, lights, lighting; candles; brightness, illumination," from Late Latin luminare "light, torch, lamp, heavenly body," literally "that which gives light," from Latin lumen (genitive luminis) "light, source of light, daylight, the light of the eye; distinguished person, ornament, glory," related to lucere "to shine," from suffixed (iterative) form of PIE root *leuk- "light, brightness."

From late 15c. as "celestial body." Sense of "notable person" is first recorded 1690s, though the Middle English word also had a figurative sense of "source of spiritual light, example of holiness" (mid-15c.). As an adjective, "pertaining to light," from 1794 but this is rare.
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photic (adj.)

1843, "pertaining to light;" 1899, "pertaining to the parts of the ocean penetrated by sunlight," from Greek phot-, combining form of phōs "light" (related to phainein "to show, to bring to light," from PIE root *bha- (1) "to shine") + -ic. Photics "the science of light" is attested by 1858.

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floodlight (n.)
also flood-light, 1924, from flood (n.) + light (n.). Related: Floodlit.
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photosphere (n.)

1660s, "orb of light, envelop of light," from photo- "light" + sphere. Astronomical sense "luminous envelop around the sun (or another star)" is from 1848. Related: Photospheric.

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luculent (adj.)

early 15c., "luminous, bright;" 1590s, "evident, lucid," from Latin luculentus "full of light, bright, splendid," from the stem of lux "light" (from PIE root *leuk- "light, brightness").

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luciferous (adj.)
"light-bringing, emitting light," 1650s, from Latin lucifer "light-bringing" (see Lucifer) + -ous. Figurative use "affording means of discovery" is earliest (1640s) and more common. Related: Luciferously.
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