Etymology
Advertisement
chad (n.1)

also Mr. Chad, simple graffiti drawing of a head peering over a fence or wall, with the caption, "Wot, no ______?" (the U.S. version usually had "Kilroy was here"), 1945, British, of unknown origin, a reaction to war-time shortages and rationing.

Related entries & more 
Advertisement
corbel (n.)

"piece of stone, wood, etc., projecting from the vertical face of a wall to support some object," mid-14c., from Old French corbel, diminutive of corb "raven," from Latin corvus (see corvine); so called from its beaked shape. Corbel-step is attested from 1819.

Related entries & more 
*dheigw- 

Proto-Indo-European root meaning "to stick, fix." 

It forms all or part of: affix; crucifix; crucify; dig; dike; ditch; fibula; fiche; fichu; fix; fixate; fixation; fixity; fixture; infibulate; infibulation; microfiche; prefix; suffix; transfix.

It is the hypothetical source of/evidence for its existence is provided by: Sanskrit dehi- "wall;" Old Persian dida "wall, stronghold, fortress," Persian diz; Latin figere "to fix, fasten, drive, thrust in; pierce through, transfix;" Lithuanian dygstu, dygti "germinate;" Old Irish dingid "presses, thrusts down;" Old English dic "trench, ditch," Dutch dijk "dam." 

Related entries & more 
septum (n.)

"wall separating two cavities," especially "the partition between the nostrils," 1690s, Modern Latin, from Latin saeptum "a fence, enclosure, partition," from neuter past participle of saepire "to hedge in," from saepes"a hedge, a fence," which de Vaan suggests is from a PIE *seh-i- "to tie." Related: Septal.

Related entries & more 
parietal (adj.)

early 15c., "pertaining to the walls of a cavity in the body," from Late Latin parietalis "of walls," from Latin paries (genitive parietis) "wall" (of a building), a word of unknown origin. In U.S. also "pertaining to the residents and rules of a college or university" (1837; compare intramural). Combining form is parieto-.

Related entries & more 
Advertisement
pubis (n.)

"a pubic bone, bone structure that forms the anterior wall of the pelvis," 1590s, from Latin pubes (genitive pubis) "genital area, groin," via os pubis "pubic bone." Latin pubes (n.) is related to or identical with pubes (adj.) "adult, full-grown, manly," a word of uncertain origin.

Related entries & more 
guttersnipe (n.)
also gutter-snipe, 1857, from gutter (n.) + snipe (n.); originally Wall Street slang for "streetcorner broker," attested later (1869) as "street urchin," also "one who gathers rags and paper from gutters." As a name for the common snipe, it dates from 1874 but is perhaps earlier.
Related entries & more 
stucco (n.)
fine plaster used as a wall coating, 1590s, from Italian stucco, from a Germanic source (compare Old High German stukki "crust, piece, fragment"), from Proto-Germanic *stukkjam, from PIE root *(s)teu- (1) "to push, stick, knock, beat" (see stock (n.1)). The verb is attested from 1726. Related: Stuccoed; stuccoing.
Related entries & more 
Balthazar 
masc. proper name, from French, from Latin, from Greek Baltasar, from Hebrew Belteshatztzar, Biblical king of Babylon (who "saw the writing on the wall"), from Babylonian Balat-shar-usur, literally "save the life of the king." As a type of very large wine bottle by 1935, in allusion to Daniel v.1.
Related entries & more 
facing (n.)
"defiance," 1520s, verbal noun from face (v.). Meaning "action of turning the face toward" is from 1540s; that of "covering in front of a garment" is from 1560s; that of "a coating" is from 1580s; that of "front or outer part of a wall, building, etc.," is from 1823. Earliest use is as "disfiguring, defacing" (c. 1400).
Related entries & more 

Page 5