Etymology
Advertisement
ambulatory (adj.)
1620s, "pertaining to walking;" also "movable; shifting, not permanent," from Latin ambulatorius "pertaining to a walker; movable," from ambulator, agent noun from past participle stem of ambulare "to walk, go about" (see amble (v.)). Middle English had ambulary "movable" (mid-15c.). Related: Ambulatorial.
Related entries & more 
Advertisement
stoa (n.)
"portico," c. 1600, from Greek stoa "colonnade, corridor," from PIE root *sta- "to stand, make or be firm." A name given in Athens to several public buildings. The ancient stoa was "usually a detached portico, often of considerable extent, generally near a public place to afford opportunity for walking or conversation under shelter" [Century Dictionary].
Related entries & more 
goose-step (n.)
1806, originally a military drill to teach balance; "to stand on each leg alternately and swing the other back and forth." This, presumably, reminded someone of a goose's way of walking. In reference to "marching without bending the knees" (as in Nazi military reviews) it apparently is first recorded 1916. As a verb by 1854.
Related entries & more 
crab (n.2)

"fruit of the wild apple tree," a small and tart variety of apple, c. 1300 (mid-13c. in place-names), crabbe, perhaps from Scandinavian words (compare Swedish krabbäpple) which are of obscure origin. As "walking stick made of crab wood" by 1740. Crab-tree is from early 15c.  Crab-apple for "fruit of the wild apple tree" is by 1712.

Related entries & more 
ingress (n.)

mid-15c., from Latin ingressus "an advance; walking; an entry," from ingress-, past participle stem of ingredi "to step into, enter," from in- "in" (from PIE root *en "in") + gradi "to step, go" (from PIE root *ghredh- "to walk, go"). The verb meaning "to enter, go in" sometimes said to be American English, but it is attested from early 14c.

Related entries & more 
Advertisement
gyromancy (n.)
1550s, method of divination said to have been practiced by a person walking in a circle marked with characters or signs till he fell from dizziness, the inference being drawn from the place in the circle at which he fell; from Medieval Latin gyromantia, from Greek gyyros "circle" (see gyro- (n.)) + manteia "divination, oracle" (see -mancy).
Related entries & more 
bacillus (n.)
1877, medical Latin, from Late Latin bacillus "wand," literally "little staff," diminutive of baculum "a stick, staff, walking stick," from PIE *bak- "staff" (also source of Greek bakterion; see bacteria) + instrumentive suffix -culo. Introduced as a term in bacteriology 1853 by German botanist Ferdinand Cohn (1828-1898).
Related entries & more 
cane (n.)
late 14c., "long slender woody stem," from Old French cane "reed, cane, spear" (13c., Modern French canne), from Latin canna "reed, cane," from Greek kanna, perhaps from Babylonian-Assyrian qanu "tube, reed" (compare Hebrew qaneh, Arabic qanah "reed"), which may come from Sumerian-Akkadian gin "reed." Sense of "length of cane used as a walking stick" is from 1580s.
Related entries & more 
preamble (n.)

"prologue, preface, preliminary statement," late 14c., from Old French preambule (13c.) and directly from Medieval Latin preambulum, neuter adjective used as a noun, properly "preliminary," from Late Latin praeambulus "walking before," from Latin prae "before" (see pre-) + ambulare "to walk" (see amble (v.)). Especially the introductory paragraph of a statute or resolution, stating the reason for and intent of what follows. Related: Preambulary.

Related entries & more 
crampon (n.)

c. 1300, "metal bar bent at the ends for fastening," from Old French crampoun "cramp, brace, staple" (13c.), from Germanic (see cramp (n.1); also compare cramp (n.2)). As "apparatus used in the raising of heavy weights," mid-15c. By 1789 as "plate set with spikes, fastened to the foot to assist in walking on ice or climbing rock."

Related entries & more 

Page 5