Etymology
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spook (v.)
1867, "to walk or act like a ghost," from spook (n.). Meaning "to unnerve" is from 1935. Related: Spooked; spooking.
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clomp (v.)

"to walk as with clogs," 1829, probably echoic or a variant of clump (v.). Related: Clomped; clomping.

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grallatorial (adj.)

"of or pertaining to wading birds," 1825, from Latin grallotores "stilt-walkers," plural of grallator "one who walks on stilts," from grallae "stilts," ultimately from stem of gradi "to walk, go" (from PIE root *ghredh- "to walk, go"). Grallatores was formerly used as the name of an order of birds comprising herons, cranes, etc. Related: Grallatory (1835).

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tramp (v.)
late 14c., "walk heavily, stamp," from Middle Low German trampen "to stamp," from Proto-Germanic *tremp- (source also of Danish trampe, Swedish trampa "to tramp, stamp," Gothic ana-trimpan "to press upon"), from PIE *der- (1) "to run, walk, step" (see tread (v.)). Related: Tramped; tramping.
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expatiate (v.)
1530s, "walk about, roam freely," from Latin expatiatus/exspatiatus, past participle of expatiari/exspatiari "wander, digress, wander from the way; spread, extend," from ex "out" (see ex-) + spatiari "to walk, spread out," from spatium (see space (n.)). Meaning "talk or write at length" is 1610s. Related: Expatiated; expatiating.
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transgress (v.)
Origin and meaning of transgress

late 15c., transgressen, "to sin," from Old French transgresser (14c.), from Latin transgressus, past participle of transgredi "step across, step over; climb over, pass, go beyond," from trans "across, beyond" (see trans-) + gradi (past participle gressus) "to walk, go" (from PIE root *ghredh- "to walk, go") . Related: Transgressed; transgressing.

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leg (v.)
"to use the legs; walk or run," c. 1500 (from the beginning usually with it); from leg (n.).
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demarche (n.)

1650s, "walk, step, manner of proceeding," from French démarche (15c.) literally "gait, walk, bearing," from démarcher (12c.) "to march," from de- (see de-) + marcher (see march (v.)). Meaning "a diplomatic step" attested from 1670s. A word never quite nativized, though it appears in Century Dictionary (1897) as demarch.

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plantigrade (adj.)

"walking on the whole sole of the foot" (opposed to digitigrade), 1831, from French plantigrade "walking on the sole of the foot" (1795), from Latin planta "sole of the foot" (from nasalized form of PIE root *plat- "to spread") + gradi "to walk, go, step" (from PIE root *ghredh- "to walk, go"). Used of man and other quadrupeds (bears, etc.) whose heels touch the ground in walking.

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trudge (v.)
"to walk laboriously," 1540s, of unknown origin. Related: Trudged; trudging. The noun meaning "an act of trudging" is attested from 1835.
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