Etymology
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air-gun (n.)
1753, "gun in which condensed air propels the ball or bullet," 1753, from air (n.1) + gun (n.).
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air-port (n.2)
"small opening in the side of a ship to admit air and light," 1788, from air (n.1) + port (n.2).
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aloft (adv.)
"on high, in the air," c. 1200, from a Scandinavian source such as Old Norse a lopt "up above," literally "up in the air," from a "in, on" (see on) + lopt "sky, air, atmosphere; loft, upper room," from the general Germanic word for "air" (cognate with Gothic luftus, Old High German luft, Old English lyft "air;" see loft (n.)). Scandinavian -pt- pronounced like -ft-. The Old English equivalent was on þa lyft.
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aerophyte (n.)
"plant which lives exclusively on air," 1838, perhaps via French aerophyte, from aero- "air" + -phyte "plant."
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strut (v.)

"walk in a vain, important manner, walk with affected dignity," 1590s, from Middle English strouten "display one's clothes proudly, vainly flaunt fine attire" (late 14c.), earlier "to stick out, protrude, bulge, swell," from Old English strutian "to stand out stiffly, swell or bulge out," from Proto-Germanic *strut- (source also of Danish strutte, German strotzen "to be puffed up, be swelled," German Strauß "fight"), from PIE root *ster- (1) "stiff."

Originally of the air or the attitude; modern sense, focused on the walk, first recorded 1510s. Related: Strutted; strutting. To strut (one's) stuff is first recorded 1926, from strut as the name of a dance popular from c. 1900. The noun meaning "a vain and affectedly dignified manner of walking" is from c. 1600.

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airplane (n.)
1907, air-plane, from air (n.1) + plane (n.1); though the earliest uses are British, the word caught on in American English, where it largely superseded earlier aeroplane (1873 in this sense and still common in British English). Aircraft as "airplane" also is from 1907. Lord Byron, speculating on future travel, used air-vessel (1822); and in 1865 aeromotive (based on locomotive) was used, also air-boat (1870).
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moonwalk (n.)

1966, "a walking on the moon," from moon (n.) + walk (n.). As a dance move in which the dancer  moves backward while appearing to walk forward it was popularized 1983 by Michael Jackson. 

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major (v.)

of a college or university student, "focus (one's) studies," 1910, American English, from major (n.) in sense of "subject of specialization" (by 1890). Related: Majored; majoring. Earlier as a verb, in Scottish, "to prance about, or walk backwards and forwards with a military air and step" [Jamieson, 1825] a sense derived from the military major.

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plantigrade (adj.)

"walking on the whole sole of the foot" (opposed to digitigrade), 1831, from French plantigrade "walking on the sole of the foot" (1795), from Latin planta "sole of the foot" (from nasalized form of PIE root *plat- "to spread") + gradi "to walk, go, step" (from PIE root *ghredh- "to walk, go"). Used of man and other quadrupeds (bears, etc.) whose heels touch the ground in walking.

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digitigrade (adj.)
Origin and meaning of digitigrade

"walking on the toes with the heel raised from the ground" (opposed to plantigrade), by 1819, from Modern Latin digitigradus, from digitus "toe" (see digit) + gradi "to walk, go, step" (from PIE root *ghredh- "to walk, go"). As a noun, "a digitigrade mammal," by 1802.

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