Etymology
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panorama (n.)

1796, "a painting on a revolving cylindrical surface," representing scenes too extended to be beheld all at once, coined c. 1789 by inventor, Irish artist Robert Barker, literally "a complete view," from pan- "all" + Greek horama "sight, spectacle, that which is seen," from horan "to look, see," which is possibly from PIE root *wer- (3) "to perceive, observe." Meaning "comprehensive survey, complete or entire view" is by 1801.

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misanthropy (n.)

"hatred or dislike of mankind, the habit of taking the worst possible view of human character and motives," 1650s, from Greek misanthrōpia "hatred of mankind," from misanthrōpos "hating mankind" (see misanthrope).

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specular (adj.)

1570s, "reflective" (like a mirror), from Latin specularis, from speculum "a mirror" (see speculum). Meaning "assisting in vision; affording a view" is from 1650s, from Latin speculari "to spy" (see speculation).

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cisalpine (adj.)

"south of the Alps," 1540s, from Latin cisalpinus "on this side of the Alps" (from the Roman point of view), from cis- "on this side" (see cis-) + Alpinus "Alpine" (see Alpine). Compare ultramontane.

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prospectus (n.)

"printed plan or sketch meant to make known the chief features of some proposed enterprise," 1765, from French prospectus (1723) and directly from Latin prospectus "a lookout, a view" (see prospect (n.)).

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agitated (adj.)

1610s, "set in motion," past-participle adjective from agitate (v.). The meaning "disturbed" is from 1650s; that of "disturbed in mind" is from 1756. The sense of "kept constantly in public view" is from 1640s.

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realistic (adj.)

1829, of art, literature, etc., "true to reality, exhibiting realism in description or representation;" 1831 as "involving a practical view of life" (opposed to idealistic); see realist + -ic. Related: Realistically.

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negativism (n.)

1824, "the policy of opposition;" see negative (adj.) + -ism. Or, specifically, "the views of a negationist" (one who simply denies beliefs commonly held without asserting an opposite view). Related: Negativistic.

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disclosure (n.)

1590s, "act of opening up to view, a making known or revealing;" see disclose + -ure. Formed in English, perhaps on model of closure. Meaning "that which is disclosed or made known" is by 1825.

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interlope (v.)

"intrude where one has no business," especially with a view to gain the advantage or profits of another (as a trader without a proper licence), early 17c., probably a back-formation from interloper (q.v.). Related: Interloped; interloping.

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