Etymology
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dial-up (adj.)

1961 in reference to a data transmission link via public telephone network, from the verbal phrase; see dial (v.) + up (adv.).

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cybercafe (n.)

"cafe that offers Internet access on its computers," or (later) via Wi-Fi on customers' computers," 1994, from cyber- + cafe.

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gazelle 
c. 1600, from French gazelle, Old French gazel (14c.), probably via Spanish, ultimately from North African pronunciation of Arabic ghazal.
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Amos 
masc. proper name; third of the prophets in the Old Testament; via Latin and Greek, from Hebrew Amos, literally "borne (by God)."
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-an 
word-forming element meaning "pertaining to," from Latin -anus, adjective suffix, in some cases via French -ain, -en. From PIE *-no-.
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dj- 

consonant combination used in French orthography to represent the Arabic letter jim; it appears in some words from Arabic, Turkish, etc. taken into English via French.

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opalescence (n.)

"iridescence like that of an opal, a play of colors milky rather than brilliant," 1792; see opalescent + -ence. Perhaps via French opalescence.

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Rhone 

also Rhône, river in southeastern France, via French from Latin rhodanus, Greekrhodanos, Gaulish *rodonos, *rotonos, said to be ultimately from a pre-Indo-European element meaning "to flow."

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ferro- 
before vowels ferr-, word-forming element indicating the presence of or derivation from iron, from Latin ferro-, combining form of ferrum "iron," which is of unknown origin. Possibly of Semitic origin, via Etruscan [Klein]; Watkins suggests "possibly borrowed (via Etruscan) from the same obscure source as OE bræs "brass." Also sometimes especially indicative of the presence of iron in the ferrous state; ferri- indicating iron in the ferric state.
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coarse (adj.)

early 15c., cors "ordinary" (modern spelling is from late 16c.), probably adjectival use of noun cours (see course (n.)). Originally referring to rough cloth for ordinary wear, the sense of "rude, vulgar, unpolished" developed by c. 1500 and that of "obscene" by 1711.

Perhaps via the notion of "in regular or natural order," hence "common, vulgar" (compare the development of mean (adj.), also ornery from ordinary). Or it might be via the clothing sense, and the notion of "wanting fineness of texture or elegance of form." Or both, and there might be also an influence, via metathesis, of French gros (see gross (adj.)), which underwent a similar sense development. Related: Coarsely; coarseness.

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