Etymology
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trough (n.)

Old English trog "wooden vessel, tray, hollow vessel, canoe," from Proto-Germanic *trugaz (source also of Old Frisian, Old Saxon, Old Norse trog, Middle Dutch troch, Dutch trog, Old High German troc, German trog), from PIE *dru-ko-, from root *deru- "be firm, solid, steadfast," with specialized senses "wood, tree" and derivatives referring to objects made of wood. Originally pronounced in English with a hard -gh- (as in Scottish loch); pronunciation shifted to "-ff," but spelling remained.

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censer (n.)

"vessel used for burning incense before an altar," mid-13c., from Old French censier, a shortened form of encensier, from encens "incense" (see incense (n.)).

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sinusoid (n.)

1823 in mathematics, "the curve of sines;" 1900 in physiology in reference to a kind of irregular capillary blood vessel, from sinus (q.v.) + -oid. Related: Sinusoidal.

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chauffer (n.)

"small portable stove," 1825, variant of chafer "a vessel for heating," agent noun from chafe; with form influenced by French chauffoir "a heater," from chauffer "to heat," which also is ultimately from chafe (see chauffeur).

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vas (n.)

in anatomy, "a tube, duct, or conduit for conveying blood, lymph, semen, etc.," plural vasa, Latin, literally "vessel." Vas deferens (plural vasa defferentia) is from 1570s.

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extravasation (n.)

"escape of fluid into the tissues after a rupture," 1670s, from Latin extra "outside" (see extra-) + form derived from vas "vessel" (see vas (n.)). Related: Extravasate (1660s).

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pilot (v.)

1640s, figurative, "to guide, to lead, direct the course of, especially through an intricate or perilous passage;" 1690s in the literal sense "to conduct (a vessel) as a pilot," from pilot (n.) or from French piloter. Related: Piloted; piloting.

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steamer (n.)

1814 in the cookery sense, agent noun from steam (v.). From 1825 as "a vessel propelled by steam," hence steamer trunk (1885), one that carries the essentials for a voyage.

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poacher (n.)

1660s, "one who poaches game, one who intrudes on the preserves of another for the purpose of killing game unlawfully," agent noun from poach (v.1). Attested from 1846 as "vessel for poaching eggs," from poach (v.2).

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oiler (n.)

late 13c., "maker or seller of oil," from oil (n.) + -er (1). By 1861 as "appliance for distributing oil in machines;" by 1916 as "navy vessel carrying oil for use by other ships."

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