Etymology
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spillover (n.)
1940, from verbal phrase, from spill (v.) + over (adv.). From 1953 as an adjective.
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hankering (n.)
"mental craving," 1660s, verbal noun from hanker.
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lace-up (adj.)
1831, originally of boots, from the verbal phrase, from lace (v.) + up (adv.).
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planning (n.)

"the forming or making of plans," 1748, verbal noun from plan (v.).

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smattering (n.)
"a slight or superficial knowledge," 1530s, verbal noun from smatter (v.).
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streaking (n.)
"running naked in public," 1973, verbal noun from streak (v.).
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swearing (n.)
"utterance of profane language," mid-14c., verbal noun from swear (v.).
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whispering (n.)
Old English hwisprung, verbal noun from hwisprian (see whisper (v.)).
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filing (n.)
1712, verbal noun from file (v.1). Filing cabinet is from 1883.
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clamp-down (n.)

also clampdown, 1940 in the figurative sense "a firm, oppressive or harsh suppression or preventive action," from verbal phrase clamp down "use pressure to keep down" (1924). The verbal phrase in the figurative sense is recorded from 1941. See clamp (v.) + down (adv.).

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