Etymology
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Rh factor 
1942, from the first letters of rhesus; so called because the blood group, and its effects, were discovered in the blood of rhesus monkeys (1941).
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hemoglobin (n.)
also hæmoglobin, coloring matter in red blood cells, 1862, shortening of hæmatoglobin (1845), from Greek haimato-, combining form of haima (genitive haimatos) "blood" (see -emia) + globulin, a type of simple protein, from globule, formerly a word for "corpuscle of blood."
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thrombo- 
before vowels thromb-, word-forming element meaning "blood clot," from combining form of Greek thrombos "clot of blood" (see thrombus).
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bloodhound (n.)
also blood-hound, type of large dog used in hunting, c. 1300, from blood (n.) + hound (n.). It traces wounded prey by the scent of the blood it has spilled, or any other trace. Similar formation in Dutch bloedhond, German Bluthund.
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sang-froid (n.)

also sangfroid, "presence of mind, composure," 1712, from French sang froid, literally "cool blood," from sang "blood" (from Latin sanguis; see sanguinary) + froid "cold" (from Latin frigidus; see frigid).

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*kreue- 

*kreuə-, Proto-Indo-European root meaning "raw flesh."

It forms all or part of: 

creatine; creosote; crude; cruel; ecru; pancreas; raw; recrudesce; recrudescence.

It is the hypothetical source of/evidence for its existence is provided by: Sanskrit kravis- "raw flesh," krura- "raw, bloody;" Greek kreas "flesh;" Latin crudus "bloody, raw; cruel," cruor "thick blood;" Old Irish cru "gore, blood," Middle Irish cruaid "hardy, harsh, stern;" Old Church Slavonic kry "blood;" Old Prussian krawian, Lithuanian kraūjas "blood;" Old English hreaw "raw," hrot "thick fluid, serum."

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toxemia (n.)
"blood-poisoning," also toxaemia, 1848, from toxo- (before vowels tox-, from Greek toxon; see toxic) + -emia (from Greek haima "blood").
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sanguinary (adj.)

"characterized by slaughter," 1620s, possibly from French sanguinaire, or directly from Latin sanguinarius "pertaining to blood," from sanguis (genitive sanguinis) "blood," of unknown origin. Latin distinguished sanguis, the generic word, from cruor "blood from a wound" (related to English raw, from PIE root *kreue-).

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vascular (adj.)
1670s, in anatomy, "pertaining to conveyance or circulation of fluids," from Modern Latin vascularis "of or pertaining to vessels or tubes," from Latin vasculum "a small vessel," diminutive of vas "vessel."
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bloodsucker (n.)
also blood-sucker, late 14c., of animals (leeches, mosquitoes, etc.), from blood (n.) + sucker (n.); in the figurative sense, of persons, it is attested from 1660s. Related: Bloodsucking.
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