Etymology
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praise (v.)

c. 1300, preisen, "to express admiration of, commend, adulate, flatter" (someone or something), from Old French preisier, variant of prisier "to praise, value," from Late Latin preciare, earlier pretiare "to price, value, prize," from Latin pretium "reward, prize, value, worth," from PIE *pret-yo-, suffixed form of *pret-, extended form of root *per- (5) "to traffic in, to sell."

Specifically with God as an object from late 14c. Related: Praised; praising. It replaced Old English lof, hreþ.

The earliest sense in English was the classical one, "to assess, set a price or value on" (mid-13c.); also "to prize, hold in high esteem" (late 13c.). Now a verb in most Germanic languages (German preis, Danish pris, etc.), but only in English is it differentiated in form from its doublets price (q.v.) and prize, which represent variants of the French word with the vowel leveled but are closer in sense to the Latin originals.

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appreciation (n.)

c. 1600 "act of estimating the quality and worth of something," from French appréciation, noun of action from apprécier (14c.), from Late Latin appretiare "estimate the quality of" (see appreciate).

Generally with a sense of "high estimation" after c. 1650; sense of "a rise in value" is by 1784; that of "act of setting a value on" is from 1799. Meaning "expression of (favorable) estimation" is from 1858. There is an isolated use of appreciacioun in Middle English (c. 1400) of uncertain meaning.

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estimate (v.)
1530s, "appraise the worth of," from Latin aestimatus, past participle of aestimare "to value, appraise" (see esteem (v.)). Meaning "form an approximate notion" is from 1660s. Related: Estimated; estimates; estimating.
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devalue (v.)

"to reduce or annul the value of," 1918, a back-formation from devaluation. The earlier verb was devaluate (1898). Related: Devalued; devaluing.

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variable (n.)
"quantity that can vary in value," 1816, from variable (adj.) in mathematical sense of "quantitatively indeterminate" (1710). Related: Variably; variability.
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reverence (v.)

late 14c., reverencen, "treat (someone) with respect, honor; venerate, pay pious homage to; esteem, value; bow to (someone); do honor to," from reverence (n.). Related: Reverenced; reverencing.

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blue-chip (adj.)
1904 in reference to the high-value poker counter, also in the figurative sense of "valuable;" stock exchange sense, in reference to "shares considered a reliable investment," is first recorded 1929; especially of stocks that saw spectacular rises in value in the four years or so before the Wall Street crash of that year wiped out most of it. See blue (adj.1) + chip (n.1).
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valor (n.)
c. 1300, "value, worth," from Old French valor, valour "valor, moral worth, merit, courage, virtue" (12c.), from Late Latin valorem (nominative valor) "value, worth" (in Medieval Latin "strength, valor"), from stem of Latin valere "be strong, be worth" (from PIE root *wal- "to be strong"). The meaning "courage" is first recorded 1580s, from Italian valore, from the same Late Latin word. (The Middle English word also had a sense of "worth or worthiness in respect of manly qualities").
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endear (v.)
1580s, "to enhance the value of," also "win the affection of," from en- (1) "make, put in" + dear (adj.). Meaning "to make dear," the main modern sense, is from 1640s. Related: Endeared; endearing.
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esteem (n.)
(also steem, extyme), mid-14c., "account, value, worth," from French estime, from estimer (see esteem (v.)). Meaning "high regard" is from 1610s.
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