Etymology
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billet (n.1)

"short, thick stick of wood used for fuel," mid-15c., from Old French billette, diminutive of bille "stick of wood," from Medieval Latin billia "tree, trunk," which is possibly from Gaulish (compare Irish bile "tree trunk").

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flicker (n.2)
type of North American woodpecker, 1808, American English, said to be echoic of bird's note, or from black spots on plumage of the underparts that seem to flicker as it flits from tree to tree.
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sakura 

flowering cherry tree, 1884, from Japanese.

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crab (n.2)

"fruit of the wild apple tree," a small and tart variety of apple, c. 1300 (mid-13c. in place-names), crabbe, perhaps from Scandinavian words (compare Swedish krabbäpple) which are of obscure origin. As "walking stick made of crab wood" by 1740. Crab-tree is from early 15c.  Crab-apple for "fruit of the wild apple tree" is by 1712.

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locust (n.2)
North American tree, used for ornament and lumber, 1630s, a transferred use (based on resemblance) from locust-tree "carob tree" (1610s), the fruit of which supposedly resembles the insect (see locust (n.1)). Greek akris "locust" often was applied in the Levant to carob pods. In U.S. from late 19c. policemen's clubs were famously made from locust wood (locust-club is attested from 1887).
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lind (n.)
"the linden tree," Old English lind; see linden.
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monkey-bread (n.)

"fruit of the baobab tree," 1789, from monkey (n.) + bread (n.).

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kapok (n.)
also in early use capoc, "type of silky wool used for stuffing, etc.," 1735 in reference to the large tropical tree which produces it; 1750 of the fiber, from Malay (Austronesian) kapoq, name of the tree.
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cashew (n.)
in early use also cachou, etc., "the cashew tree, or its edible nut," 1703, a shortening of French acajou, from older Portuguese acajú from Tupi (Brazil) acajuba, name of the tree that produces the nut.
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rhododendron (n.)

shrub much cultivated for its profuse, handsome flowers, also noted for its leathery evergreen leaves, 1660s, from French rhododendron and directly from Latin rhododendron, from Greek rhododendron, etymologically "rose-tree," from rhodon "rose" (see rose (n.1)) + dendron "tree" (from PIE *der-drew-, from root *deru- "to be firm, solid, steadfast," also forming words for "wood, tree").

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