Etymology
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violence (n.)
late 13c., "physical force used to inflict injury or damage," from Anglo-French and Old French violence (13c.), from Latin violentia "vehemence, impetuosity," from violentus "vehement, forcible," probably related to violare (see violation). Weakened sense of "improper treatment" is attested from 1590s.
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manicure (n.)

1873, "one who professionally treats hands and fingernails," from French manicure, literally "the care of the hands and fingernails," from Latin manus "hand" (from PIE root *man- (2) "hand") + cura "care" (see cure (n.1)). Meaning "treatment and care of the hands and fingernails" is attested by 1887.

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malpractice (n.)

1670s, "bad treatment of disease, pregnancy, or bodily injury from ignorance, carelessness, or with criminal intent," a hybrid coined from mal- + practice (n.). Also used for "illegal action by which a person seeks a benefit for himself while in a position of trust" (1758).

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misuse (v.)

late 14c., misusen, "use or treat improperly;" from mis- (1) "badly, wrongly" + use (v.) and in part from Old French mesuser (Modern French méuser), from mis- (2). Meaning "abuse, treat badly, subject to ill-treatment" is attested from 1530s. Related: Misused; misusing; misusage.

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facial (adj.)
c. 1600, "face to face," from French facial, from Medieval Latin facialis "of the face," from facies (see face (n.)). Meaning "pertaining to the face" in English is from 1786. The noun meaning "beauty treatment for the face" is from 1914, American English. Middle English had faciale (n.) "face-cloth for a corpse" (early 14c.).
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therapy (n.)
1846, "medical treatment of disease," from Modern Latin therapia, from Greek therapeia "curing, healing, service done to the sick; a waiting on, service," from therapeuein "to cure, treat medically," literally "attend, do service, take care of" (see therapeutic).
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chemotherapy (n.)

"treatment of diseases by chemical substances," 1906, from German Chemotherapie, coined by German biochemist Paul Ehrlich (1854-1915), from chemo- + therapie (see therapy). Especially of cancer from 1950s; short form chemo attested by 1977.

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runaround (n.)

also run-around, "deceptive, evasive treatment," 1915, from the verbal phrase; see run (v.) + around (adv.). To run around with "associate with, consort with," especially of the opposite sex, is by 1887. To run around "go about hurriedly with no fixed goal" is by 1920.

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treaty (n.)
late 14c., "treatment, discussion," from Anglo-French treté, Old French traitié "assembly, agreement, dealings," from Latin tractatus "discussion, handling, management," from tractare "to handle, manage" (see treat (v.)). Sense of "contract or league between nations or sovereigns" is first recorded early 15c.
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meteorology (n.)

"science of the earth's atmosphere, scientific study of weather and climate," especially with a view to forecasting the weather, 1610s, from French météorologie and directly from Greek meteōrologia "treatise on celestial phenomena," literally "discussion of high things," from meteōron "thing high up" (see meteor) + -logia "treatment of" (see -logy).

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