Etymology
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U-boat (n.)
1916 (said to have been in use from 1913), partial translation of German U-Boot, short for Unterseeboot, literally "undersea boat."
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Baton Rouge 
city in Louisiana, U.S., a French translation of Choctaw (Muskogean) itti homma "red pole," perhaps in reference to a painted boundary marker.
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militarization (n.)

"action of turning (something) to military use," 1881 (in italics in a 1871 translation from French), probably rendering French militarisation (by 1853); noun of action from militarize (q.v.).

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zwieback (n.)
1894, from German Zweiback "biscuit," literally "twice-baked," from zwei "two, twice" + backen "to bake;" loan-translation of Italian biscotto (see biscuit).
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loan-word (n.)
"word taken untranslated from one language into another," 1860, a translation of German Lehnwort, properly "lend-word," from lehnen "lend" (see lend (v.)) + Word (see word (n.)).
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pitchblende (n.)

also pitch-blende, oxide of uranium, usually occurring in pitchy black masses, 1770, a loan-translation of German Pechblende; see pitch (n.2) + blende.

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Douai 

or Douay, name of town in northern France, used elliptically in reference to the English translation of the Bible begun there late 16c., sanctioned by Roman Catholic Church. Also called Rhemish or  Rheims-Douai translation because it was published in Rheims in 1582. It uses more Latinate words than Tyndale or the KJV. The place name is from the Gaulish personal name Dous + Gallo-Roman -acum.

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liverwurst (n.)
also liver-wurst, 1852, partial translation of German Leberwurst "liver-sausage," from Leber "liver" (see liver (n.1)) + Wurst "sausage" (see wurst).
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interpretation (n.)
mid-14c. "a translated text, a translation" (late 13c. in Anglo-French), from Old French interpretacion, entrepretatiun "explanation, translation" (12c.) and directly from Latin interpretationem (nominative interpretatio) "explanation, exposition," noun of action from past participle stem of interpretari "explain, expound; understand" (see interpret).

From late 14c. as "act or process of explaining or interpreting; an explanation; construction placed upon an action." Meaning "dramatic or musical representation" is from 1880.
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sharpshooter (n.)
also sharp-shooter, 1800; see sharp (adj.) + shoot (v.). A translation of German Scharfschütze, from scharf (adj.) "sharp" + schütze "shooter," from schießen "to shoot." Related: Sharpshooting.
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