Etymology
Advertisement
appealing (adj.)

1590s, "suppliant, applying to a higher authority," present-participle adjective from appeal (v.). The sense of "attractive" is attested by 1854. Related: Appealingly.

Related entries & more 
Advertisement
uncontrollable (adj.)

1570s, "irrefutable," from un- (1) "not" + controllable. From 1590s as "not subject to authority;" meaning "that cannot be restrained" is from 1640s. Related: Uncontrollably.

Related entries & more 
predominance (n.)

"quality of being predominant; superiority in power, authority, or influence," c. 1600; see predominant + -ance. Related: Predominancy (1590s).

Related entries & more 
commission (n.)
Origin and meaning of commission

mid-14c., "authority entrusted to someone, delegated authority or power," from Old French commission and directly from Latin commissionem (nominative commissio) "act of committing," in Medieval Latin "delegation of business," noun of action from past participle stem of committere "to unite, connect, combine; to bring together," from com "with, together" (see com-) + mittere "to release, let go; send, throw" (see mission).

Meaning "document delegating authority" is from early 15c.; meaning "body of persons charged with authority for the performance of certain special duties" is from late 15c. Sense of "anything entrusted to anyone to perform" is from 1560s; sense of "act of committing or doing" is from 1590s.

Naval sense "period of active service of a warship" is by 1882 (in commission "under the command of an officer" is from 1733). Hence out of commission "laid up in a navy yard or in reserve" (1878), subsequently extended to other machinery, and, figuratively, to persons or human qualities by 1917.

In commercial use, "authority delegated by another for the purchase and sale of goods," 1620s. Meaning "allowance made or percentage given to an agent for transacting business" is from 1725.

Related entries & more 
semi-official (adj.)

also semiofficial, "partly official; depending partly on official authority or knowledge," 1798, from semi- + official (adj.). Related: Semi-officially.

Related entries & more 
Advertisement
safe-conduct (n.)

 "privilege of safe passage" granted by an authority, late 13c., from Old French sauf-conduit (13c.); see safe (adj.) + conduct (n.).

Related entries & more 
death-warrant (n.)

1690s, "warrant of capital execution from proper authority," from death + warrant (n.). Figurative sense of "anything which puts an end to hope or expectation" is from 1874.

Related entries & more 
Sunni (n.)

1620s, from Arabic, "adherent of the Sunnah; Muslim who accepts the orthodox tradition as well as the Quran," from Sunna "traditional teachings of Muhammad" (not, like the Quran, committed to writing, but preserved from his lips by his disciples or founded on his actions), literally "way, custom, course, tradition, usage." Related: Sunnite.

Related entries & more 
assertive (adj.)

1560s, "declaratory, positive, full of assertion," from assert (v.) + -ive. The meaning "insisting on one's rights or authority" is short for self-assertive.

Related entries & more 
quarantine (v.)

"put under quarantine" in any sense, also figurative, "to isolate, as by authority," 1804, from quarantine (n.). Related: Quarantined; quarantining; quarantinable.

Related entries & more 

Page 5