Etymology
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tangent (adj.)
1590s, "meeting at a point without intersecting," from Latin tangentem (nominative tangens), present participle of tangere "to touch," from PIE root *tag- "to touch, handle." First used by Danish mathematician Thomas Fincke in "Geomietria Rotundi" (1583). Extended sense of "slightly connected with a subject" is first recorded 1825. Related: Tangence; tangency.
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haptic (adj.)
"pertaining to the sense of touch," 1890, from Greek haptikos "able to come into contact with," from haptein "to fasten" (see apse).
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tickle (v.)
c. 1300 (implied in tickling) "to touch lightly so as to cause a peculiar and uneasy or thrilling sensation in the nerves," of uncertain origin, possibly a frequentative form of tick (v.) in its older sense of "to touch." Some suggest a metathesis of Middle English kittle, which is from a shared Germanic word for "to tickle," but tickle is attested earlier. The Old English form was tinclian.

Meaning "to excite agreeably" (late 14c.) is a translation of Latin titillare. Meaning "to poke or touch so as to excite laughter" is from early 15c.; figurative sense of "to excite, amuse" is attested from 1680s. The noun is recorded from 1801. To tickle (one's) fancy is from 1640s. Related: Tickler.
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abut (v.)
Origin and meaning of abut

mid-13c., "to end at, to border on, touch at the end," from Old French aboter, abuter "join end to end, touch with an end" (13c.), and abouter "join end to end," from à "to" (see ad-) + boter, bouter "to strike, push," from a Germanic source, from Proto-Germanic *buttan, from PIE root *bhau- "to strike." Compare butt (v.). Related: Abutted; abutting.

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healing (n.)
"restoration to health," Old English hæling, verbal noun from heal (v.). Figurative sense of "restoration of wholeness" is from early 13c.; meaning "touch that cures" is from 1670s.
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finger (v.)
early 15c., "to touch or point to with the finger" (but see fingering (n.1) from late 14c.), from finger (n.). Sense of "play upon a musical instrument" is from 1510s. Meaning "touch or take thievishly" is from 1520s. The meaning "identify a criminal" is underworld slang first recorded 1930. Related: Fingered; fingering. Compare Dutch vingeren, German fingern, Swedish fingra, all from their respective nouns.
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impatiens (n.)
type of flowering plant, from Latin impatiens "impatient" (see impatient). So called in reference to the valves of the seed pods, which discharge forcibly at a slight touch.
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softness (n.)
Old English softnes "ease, comfort; state of being soft to the touch; luxury;" see soft (adj.) + -ness. Meaning "weakness of character, effeminacy" is from c. 1600.
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taint (v.)

1570s, "to corrupt, contaminate," also "to touch, tinge, imbue slightly" (1590s), from Middle English teynten "to convict, prove guilty" (late 14c.), which is partly from Old French ataint, past participle of ataindre "to touch upon, seize" (see attainder). It also is from Anglo-French teinter "to color, dye" (early 15c.), from Old French teint (12c.), past participle of teindre "to dye, color," from Latin tingere (see tincture). Related: Tainted; tainting.

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integrate (v.)
1630s, "to render (something) whole, bring together the parts of," from Latin integratus, past participle of integrare "make whole," from integer "whole, complete," figuratively, "untainted, upright," literally "untouched," from in- "not" (see in- (1)) + root of tangere "to touch," from PIE root *tag- "to touch, handle."

The meaning "put together parts or elements and combine them into a whole" is from 1802. The "racially desegregate" sense (1940) probably is a back-formation from integration. Related: Integrated; integrating.
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